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Law & Order => Missing Persons => Topic started by: Carnut on October 28, 2008, 02:12:05 PM



Title: Stacy Peterson / Drew Peterson Case
Post by: Carnut on October 28, 2008, 02:12:05 PM
A Year After Stacy Peterson Vanished, Husband Calls It 'Just Another Day'.

 It's been a year since Stacy Peterson disappeared from her suburban Chicago home. And while the rest of her family searches for closure, her husband — named a suspect in her disappearance — says through his publicist that the anniversary is "just another day of her being away."

The 23-year-old mother from Bolingbrook, Ill., vanished on Oct. 28 last year, after failing to keep an appointment with her sister. In the months following her disappearance, police named her husband, Drew, as a suspect, and they exhumed the body of his third wife, Kathleen Savio, who initially had been thought to have drowned when her body was found in the family's empty bathtub.

A new autopsy concluded that Savio died from a homicide and not, as initially believed, by accidental drowning.

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,444375,00.html (http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,444375,00.html)


Title: Re: A Year After Stacy Peterson Vanished, Husband Calls It 'Just Another Day'
Post by: Sue on October 28, 2008, 02:15:40 PM
sure wish they would arrest him also
this has gone on long enough
Now that she has been gone one year he can offically file for divorse watch it is coming soon


Title: Drew Peterson, 54, is engaged again
Post by: Sue on December 17, 2008, 10:37:53 AM
http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,468348,00...

The former police officer who is a suspect in the disappearance of his fourth wife and whose third wife died suspiciously in a bathtub plans to walk down the aisle for a fifth time

Drew Peterson, 54, is engaged again, his lawyer and publicist confirmed Wednesday to FOXNews.com .

Though Peterson is still married to fourth wife Stacy, who was 23 when she disappeared last year, he has found a new 23-year-old fiancée, he told "Drew Peterson Exposed" author Derek Armstrong Tuesday.


Title: Re: Drew Peterson, 54, is engaged again
Post by: Sam on December 17, 2008, 11:01:34 AM
I guess I do not understand it . Why would anyone want to marry a killer?

I wonder if she has parents? I wonder if she is a psychopath herself? Maybe it is Casey. LOL They would deserve each other.
Sam


Title: Re: Drew Peterson, 54, is engaged again
Post by: Cat on December 17, 2008, 11:22:38 AM
maybe they can have a joining cots in the chamber.how can they consumate it,by proxy.Barnum was right,a fool is born every day


Title: Re: Drew Peterson, 54, is engaged again
Post by: katysmom on December 18, 2008, 08:45:17 AM
I knew it, I knew it, I knew it....Drew was bound to be jealous of all the press Casey has been getting and I've just been waiting for him to pull something to put himself back in the news.
I don't care if this girl is 'of age' where the hell are her parents?  Someone pull this girl out of there.   


Title: Re: Drew Peterson, 54, is engaged again
Post by: Cat on December 18, 2008, 11:10:14 AM
Well,she needs a chip to be found later.Would save everyone some time and trouble.


Title: Re: Drew Peterson, 54, is engaged again
Post by: katysmom on December 18, 2008, 12:17:11 PM
If this wedding goes down before he is tried, I bet he'll have her adopt the kids so that Kathleen's and Stacey's family can't get them.


Title: Re: Drew Peterson, 54, is engaged again
Post by: Cat on December 18, 2008, 12:36:46 PM
Maybe he can share a needle or two with casey.


Title: Drew Peterson's Fiancee Moves Out After Father Issues Ultimatum
Post by: Carnut on January 30, 2009, 03:29:20 PM
Drew Peterson's Fiancee Moves Out After Father Issues Ultimatum

 The fiancée of ex-cop Drew Peterson, who is suspected in the disappearance of his fourth wife and the death of his third, left him after her father gave her a "him or me" ultimatum.

Christina Raines, 24, packed up and moved out of Peterson's Chicago-area house Friday with her two children after her father, Ernie Raines, forced the issue, according to "Drew Peterson Exposed" author Derek Armstrong.

Ernie Raines, 53, came to Peterson's home in Bollingbrook, Ill., Friday morning with a news crew and the police and demanded that his waitress daughter leave, he told FOX News. He said he feared for Christina's life.

"I tried to tell my daughter that I don’t want to have to wake up and find out that you’re gone," Raines told FOX. "Believe me, I couldn't sleep nights."

Raines said he didn't like the way Peterson had begun to act toward Christina.

"He was starting to control her," he said. "He was trying to use my daughter as a doormat to try to watch his kids."

Raines said Peterson told him "F— you" when he arrived at his house with police to collect his daughter.

Christina Raines left Peterson's house Friday escorted by several police cars. The couple has broken up and Peterson, 54, blames her father and the press.

"This is what the media always does to me," Armstrong quoted Peterson as saying. "As soon as the story got out on Chrissy, I knew it would be a problem for us."

Peterson admitted that his appearance on ABC's Nightline Thursday didn't help the situation.

In the segment, Peterson told the reporter, "I'd be wary of me too" when asked about Christina Raines' family and said that "when the romance is gone" in his relationships, he tends to have flings and move on.

The comments sparked a fight between the couple, Armstrong said. Christina Raines returned the engagement ring and a cell phone.

Peterson's fourth wife, 23-year-old Stacy Peterson, disappeared in October 2007. The death in a bathtub of his third wife Kathleen Savio was ruled a homicide after initially being deemed accidental. Savio's body was exhumed and re-examined after Stacy Peterson vanished. A grand jury is still weighing evidence in both cases.

Drew and Stacy Peterson have two children, 6-year-old Anthony and 4-year-old Lacy.

They remain married, though Peterson met with high-profile Chicago attorney Jeffery M. Leving — a lawyer in the Elian Gonzalez case — earlier this year to see what his rights to a split might be.

Desertion for at least one year is grounds for divorce under Illinois law, though Peterson would have to show he wasn't at fault for causing his wife to leave, Leving said.

Ernie Raines said he's glad that his daughter, at least, is safe.

"This guy don't care about nobody," Ernie Raines told FOX. "I am not afraid of that man. That's why he don't like me."

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,485905,00.html (http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,485905,00.html)


Title: Re: Drew Peterson, 54, is engaged again
Post by: Puma on February 01, 2009, 11:03:12 AM
Clearly this is a man who wants/needs/likes having a woman in his life.  No doubt he can be very charming when he wants to be.  Problem is he doesn't seem to handle the breakup phase of a relationship very well.  I don't know what the shrinks call this, but I get the impression that at the first sign of disatisfaction, he loses it.  I know, innocent until proven guilty, but this hats off to this father who had the b#$% to get his daughter out of there. 


Title: Re: Drew Peterson, 54, is engaged again
Post by: katysmom on February 02, 2009, 02:47:44 PM
I knew it, I knew it, I knew it....Drew was bound to be jealous of all the press Casey has been getting and I've just been waiting for him to pull something to put himself back in the news.
I don't care if this girl is 'of age' where the hell are her parents?  Someone pull this girl out of there.   

RIGHT AGAIN!!!!


Title: Re: Drew Peterson, 54, is engaged again
Post by: Cat on February 02, 2009, 03:07:48 PM
or put a chip in her.


Title: Drew Peterson, Fiancee Reportedly Living Together Again
Post by: Carnut on February 11, 2009, 05:54:37 PM
Drew Peterson, Fiancee Reportedly Living Together Again

 Drew Peterson's rumored fiancée, 24, moved back in with the former Illinois police sergeant, the Chicago Tribune reported, citing multiple unidentified sources.

Christina Raines told CBS' "The Early Show" earlier this month that her engagement to Peterson, 55, had been a publicity stunt after acknowledging she had known him since she was 15 years old.

Peterson and his attorney, Joel Brodsky, have insisted the couple's engagement was not a hoax, the Chicago Tribune reported.

If the engagement was real, Raines would be Peterson's sixth fiancée. If they marry, she would become his fifth wife.

Peterson's fourth wife, 23-year-old Stacy Peterson, disappeared in October 2007. The bathtub death of his third wife Kathleen Savio was ruled a homicide after initially being deemed accidental. Savio's body was exhumed and re-examined after Stacy Peterson vanished. A grand jury is still weighing evidence in both cases.

Peterson declined to comment Tuesday, the Chicago Tribune reported.

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,490967,00.html (http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,490967,00.html)


Title: TOM MORPHEY OFFERED IMMUNITY IN PETERSON CASE
Post by: katysmom on March 06, 2009, 11:03:43 AM
Exclusive: Immunity deal offered in Peterson case
From the Chicago Sun Times

March 6, 2009
By JOE HOSEY [email protected] com

BOLINGBROOK -- Details have emerged about prosecutors' offer of a free pass to the man who may have unwittingly acted as Drew Peterson's accomplice in allegedly disposing of his wife's body, so long as he sticks to the truth, his original statement and did not play a part in actually killing the missing woman.

The Herald News has obtained a copy of the immunity deal inked by State's Attorney James Glasgow for Thomas Morphey in exchange for his testimony.
» Click to enlarge image
Drew and Stacy Peterson


RELATED STORIES
• Special section: The Peterson Case

Glasgow signed the immunity agreement more than 17 months ago, yet sources say Morphey has never appeared before the grand jury investigating the disappearance of Peterson's wife, Stacy Peterson.

Glasgow made the agreement offer on Halloween 2007, three days after Stacy, who is Peterson's fourth wife, was last seen alive and likely while Morphey was still hospitalized following an Oct. 29 suicide attempt.

Morphey overdosed on sleeping pills after he learned Stacy vanished and he feared he may have something to do with her disappearance, sources said. Morphey's suspicions were based on his helping Peterson carry a blue barrel out of his stepbrother's bedroom, down the stairs, outside to the driveway and into the back of his waiting Yukon Denali the night of Oct. 28, sources said.

Not only that, police sources allege Morphey assisted Peterson in a scheme to set cell phone towers pinging near the home of her friend Scott Rossetto, a male nurse living in Shorewood. The sources said they suspected Peterson was trying to frame Rossetto for doing away with Stacy.

Peterson is believed to have left his cell phone with Morphey in Bolingbrook, then went to Shorewood with Stacy's cell phone. Peterson is alleged to have called his own cell with Stacy's from Shorewood to leave a record of the call, sources said.

After Morphey was released from Edward Hospital in Naperville, where Peterson says he paid his stepbrother a visit, he vanished from his Bolingbrook home. His girlfriend, Sheryl Alcox, said at the time that Morphey was in "therapy." Peterson has repeatedly said the authorities put Morphey, who has struggled with substance abuse, someplace to "dry out."

Morphey is back in his Thistle Drive home and has been for months. He declined to discuss his immunity agreement -- or anything else relating to the Peterson case -- on the record.
Immunity deal
The immunity agreement signed by Glasgow is contingent on Morphey making a "full, truthful and complete statement of all information he has concerning the disappearance of Stacy Peterson and the activities of himself and Drew Peterson immediately prior to and including the weekend of October 27th, 2007. Thomas Morphey will also testify consistently with his statement and truthfully in any future court proceedings relating to the disappearance of Stacy Peterson."

But if Morphey gets caught lying or holding back on his story regarding his "information and knowledge of the kidnapping or murder of Stacy Peterson, or if any evidence emerges indicating that Thomas Morphey personally participated in the murder of Stacy Peterson, this agreement shall be null and void."

Peterson laughed when told of the immunity offer for his stepbrother and said, "Un (expletive) believable." He would not elaborate.

Charles B. Pelkie, the spokesman for the state's attorney's office, declined to comment on Morphey's immunity deal.

Peterson is the sole suspect in the state police investigation of Stacy's disappearance. State police Capt. Carl Dobrich called the young woman's disappearance a "potential homicide."

The state police also are investigating the 2004 homicide of Peterson's third wife, Kathleen Savio, who was found drowned in a dry bathtub.

State police originally failed to find anything suspicious about Savio's case when they first investigated it and her death was eventually ruled accidental. Soon after Stacy disappeared, authorities determined Savio was the victim of a homicide and the state police give them another chance at figuring out who killed her.


Title: Stepbrother Says He Thinks He Helped Drew Peterson Dispose of Wife's Body
Post by: Carnut on March 11, 2009, 12:18:37 AM
Stepbrother Says He Thinks He Helped Drew Peterson Dispose of Wife's Body

 Drew Peterson's stepbrother fears that he had a hand in the murder of the former Illinois police sergeant's fourth wife, Stacy Peterson — telling a Chicago-area newspaper that he helped Drew Peterson dispose of a blue barrel that may have contained Stacy's remains.

Stacy Peterson disappeared in October 2007. Her husband has been the focus of a police and grand jury investigation, but he never has been charged.

Thomas Morphey, the stepbrother, told the Herald News that he thinks Stacy, 23, was in the blue barrel that he helped remove from the Petersons' home in Bolingbrook, Ill., and put into a car.

Beforehand, Morphey told the Herald News, Peterson, 55, had come to his home to take him to a nearby store where Peterson supposedly had set up an interview for him. But instead, the two went to a park, where a conversation led him to believe Peterson was planning to murder Stacy's boyfriend, Morphey said.

“We went to that park to discuss Stacy cheating on him, and he had to take care of the problem,” Morphey told the newspaper. "I didn’t think for a minute he was going to try to kill her.”

Peterson started questioning Morphey's love for him and asked if he would kill for him.

When Morphey said no, Drew Peterson allegedly asked, "Could you live with knowing about it?"

Morphey told the newspaper that he responded, "Yeah, I guess," adding that he always figured Peterson had killed his third wife, Kathleen Savio.

Savio's death in a bathtub was ruled a homicide after initially being deemed accidental. Savio's body was exhumed and re-examined after Stacy Peterson vanished.

Morphey told the Herald News that the night after meeting Peterson in the park, he met up with Peterson, who enlisted his help with the blue barrel.

Morphey was offered immunity by police to tell them what happened that night, but has yet to tell it to a grand jury, he said.

Peterson insists Morphey is lying.

"He’s hallucinating," he told the newspaper.

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,508386,00.html (http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,508386,00.html)


Title: Drew Peterson Fights for Control of Third Wife's Estate in Illinois Supreme Cour
Post by: Carnut on March 11, 2009, 05:09:45 PM
Drew Peterson Fights for Control of Third Wife's Estate in Illinois Supreme Court

CHICAGO —  The former Bolingbrook police sergeant suspected in the disappearance of his fourth wife is taking his fight to regain control of his third wife's estate to the Illinois Supreme Court.

The appeal filed Wednesday follows last month's appellate court ruling, which upheld a lower court's decision to take control of the estate of Kathleen Savio away from Drew Peterson and give it to Savio's father and sister.

Peterson has denied any wrongdoing in the disappearance of Stacy Peterson, and he hasn't been named a suspect in Savio's 2004 death.

But after Stacy Peterson's 2007 disappearance, Savio's body was exhumed and her death was reclassified from accidental to a homicide.

Peterson's lawyer, Joel Brodsky, says he thinks the court will agree that the appellate court made errors in reaching its decision.

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,508911,00.html (http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,508911,00.html)


Title: Stepbrother 'Partially Thinks' Drew Peterson Tried to Frame Him for Stacy's Murd
Post by: Carnut on March 16, 2009, 02:28:42 PM
Stepbrother 'Partially Thinks' Drew Peterson Tried to Frame Him for Stacy's Murder

 The stepbrother of Drew Peterson says he’s convinced the former police officer killed his fourth wife, and may have even tried to frame him for her murder.

“I know he killed Stacy,” Thomas Morphey told “Good Morning America” in an interview that aired Monday. “All the circumstances point to it.”

Morphey said Peterson asked him before Stacy's disappearance, “How much do you love me? … Enough to kill for me?”

Morphey said he told Peterson that he did love him, but not enough to kill for him.

Peterson then took Morphey with him to look into renting a locker at a storage facility, Morphey said.

“I knew it wasn’t good. He was planning on killing someone,” Morphey told the talk show. “Sometimes I wish I had rented that locker just because we’d know where she was. I partially think the locker was put in my name so he could set me up.”

But Morphey said he now believes he does know where Peterson put Stacy’s body — in a blue barrel Morphey helped move from Peterson’s home to his SUV, the Chicago Sun-Times reported

According to Morphey, after moving the barrel, Peterson then drove him home with it still in the back of his Yukon Denali and told him on arrival, “This never happened.”

“I said ‘I won’t say a word,’” Morphey told "Good Morning America."

Peterson has repeatedly denied any involvement in Stacy’s disappearance, or the death of his third wife, Kathleen Savio, who was found dead in her bathtub in 2004.

He told WIND-AM Sunday that he and Morphey visited a storage facility before Stacy vanished because Peterson needed a place to store extra tires he’d been keeping in his garage, the Chicago Sun-Times reported.

No charges have been filed in either case.

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,509415,00.html (http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,509415,00.html)


Title: Drew Peterson Angered by Memorial Ribbons for Wives
Post by: Carnut on March 25, 2009, 02:19:01 PM
Drew Peterson Angered by Memorial Ribbons for Wives

 Drew Peterson is protesting the hanging of ribbons meant to honor his murdered third wife and missing fourth wife by allegedly cutting them down in the middle of the night and calling the police on his neighbors, the Herald News reported.

Dressed in black, he and one of his children reportedly slipped out of their house around midnight Sunday and started taking down the memorials after calls to the police failed to halt the weekend activity.

Stacy Peterson disappeared in October 2007. Her husband has been the focus of a police and grand jury investigation, but he has not been charged. Peterson's third wife, Kathleen Savio's death in a bathtub was ruled a homicide after initially being deemed accidental. Savio's body was exhumed and re-examined after Stacy Peterson vanished.

Peterson's neighbor Sharon Bychowski, along with 20 others, put white and purple ribbons on trees in the development Saturday afternoon. Soon after, Peterson cut the ribbons off four trees, Bychowski told the Herald News.

She put up another four, and they were again cut down. This continued throughout the weekend until Peterson called the police late Sunday afternoon.

"Drew called, complaining streamers were being put on the trees in the parkway," Teppel said. "He wanted them down because it is against village ordinance."

But, the ribbons weren't violating any ordinance and police didn't take action, Teppel told the Herald News.

Peterson allegedly started taking pictures of the group and got into a confrontation with at least one person who was hanging the ribbons, the newspaper reported.

"They're a bunch of liars and low-life (expletives)," he said of the group who repeatedly placed the ribbons on the trees. "There's not a job between them."

Peterson declined to comment when the newspaper asked him about the allegations that he and his child cut the ribbons in the middle of the night.

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,510498,00.html (http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,510498,00.html)


Title: Drew Peterson's rumored fiancée, Christina Raines 24, has moved out again
Post by: Carnut on April 03, 2009, 11:57:09 PM
Drew Peterson's rumored fiancée, Christina Raines 24, has moved out again according to Greta.


Title: Drew Peterson to Be Sued by Slain Third Wife's Family
Post by: Carnut on April 21, 2009, 02:42:05 PM
Drew Peterson to Be Sued by Slain Third Wife's Family

 The family of Drew Peterson's third wife plans to file a wrongful death lawsuit against the former police officer, their attorney said.

Martin Glink, the lawyer for Kathleen Savio's father and sister, told The Herald News that the suit claims Peterson and Savio clashed a number of times during their bitter divorce and Peterson entered Savio's home on two occasions against her will.

Glink said he expected to file the litigation on Monday, according to the newspaper. There was no immediate word on whether the lawsuit was brought as scheduled.

Savio was found dead in a dry bathtub in 2004, initially believed to be the victim of an accidental drowning. After Peterson's fourth wife Stacy Peterson disappeared in October 2007, Savio's body was exhumed for another autopsy. Her death was reclassified as a homicide.

Peterson has not been charged in either Stacy Peterson's disappearance or in Savio's death and has denied wrongdoing. Authorities have said he is the focus of their investigation in both cases.

Last month, the ex-Bolingbrook police sergeant announced he would take his fight to regain control of Savio's estate to the Illinois Supreme Court.

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,517284,00.html (http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,517284,00.html)


Title: Drew Peterson Says He Tells His Children Their Mother Isn't Coming Home
Post by: Carnut on April 23, 2009, 09:08:21 PM
Drew Peterson Says He Tells His Children Their Mother Isn't Coming Home

 Drew Peterson made an apparent slip Thursday on "Good Day Chicago" on the city's FOX affiliate, suggesting inexplicably that his fourth wife is gone forever.

During an interview on the morning show, he said that he tells his children their mother, Stacy Peterson, is on vacation and is not coming back.

When asked, "Why do you say she's not coming back," Peterson, a suspect in his wife's disappearance, first denied making the comment. Then, when pressed, he said it was merely a slip of the tongue.

Stacy Peterson disappeared in October 2007. Drew Peterson has been the focus of a police and grand jury investigation, but he has not been charged.

The death of Peterson's third wife, Kathleen Savio, in a bathtub was ruled a homicide after initially being deemed accidental. Savio's body was exhumed and re-examined after Stacy Peterson vanished.

Authorities have not identified him as a suspect in Savio's death. Peterson has denied any involvement in either case.

On Tuesday, his attorney, Joel Brodsky, reiterated Peterson's innocence after Savio's family filed a wrongful death lawsuit against him, alleging the former Chicago-area police sergeant drowned her in the bathtub.

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,517656,00.html (http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,517656,00.html)


Title: DREW PETERSON
Post by: katysmom on May 07, 2009, 05:28:29 PM
Shep Smith just announced that Drew Peterson has just been arressted in connection with  [hp; {;2Kathleen's murder.


Title: Drew Peterson Reportedly Arrested in Connection With Death of Third Wife
Post by: Carnut on May 07, 2009, 05:35:25 PM
Drew Peterson Reportedly Arrested in Connection With Death of Third Wife

CHICAGO —  Local media reports say Drew Peterson was arrested Thursday in connection with the death of his third wife, Kathleen Savio.

Peterson will likely be charged in the death of Kathleen Savio, who was found dead in a bathtub in her home on March 1, 2004, according to CBS2chicago.com.

MyFOXChicago.com reported that Peterson was arrested at 5:35 p.m. Thursday after state police surrounded his car. Peterson was alone in his car at the time.

Six state police searched Peterson's home, MyFOXChicago.com reported.

Peterson has been a suspect in the disappearance of his 23-year-old wife Stacy Peterson, who vanished on Oct. 28, 2007, from her Bolingbrook, Ill., home.

In the months following Stacy Peterson's disappearance, Savio's body was exhumed and her 2004 bathtub drowning death was re-classified as a homicide.

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,519392,00.html (http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,519392,00.html)


Title: Drew Peterson Charged With Murdering Third Wife, Held on $20M Bond
Post by: Carnut on May 07, 2009, 08:22:20 PM
Drew Peterson Charged With Murdering Third Wife, Held on $20M Bond

 Drew Peterson is being held on $20 million bond after being arrested Thursday and charged with two counts of first-degree murder in the drowning death of his third wife.

The arrest is the biggest development yet in the case against the former Chicago-area police sergeant — who launched into the national spotlight after the suspicious disappearance in October 2007 of his fourth wife, Stacy Peterson.

Peterson hasn't been charged in Stacy Peterson's disappearance but now faces charges that he killed Kathleen Savio, his third wife, who was found at home dead in a dry bathtub on March 1, 2004.

Illinois police and prosecutors held a news conference Thursday night about the murder indictment. Will County State's Attorney James Glasgow said he intended to introduce evidence that would allow Savio "to testify from the grave" via third-party statements.

Police said the arrest and indictment were the result of 18 months of intensive police work that garnered hundreds of leads and produces thousands of pages of investigative reports.

MyFOXChicago.com reported that Peterson was arrested at 5:35 p.m. Thursday after state police surrounded his car at an intersection. Peterson was alone in his car at the time.

“I guess I should have returned those library books,” Peterson said as he was being taken into state police headquarters, the Herald News reported.

State police later searched Peterson's home, MyFOXChicago.com reported.

Peterson's attorney, Joel Brodsky, told the Chicago Tribune he was unaware of the arrest.

"You know more than I do. I'm on a plane it's taking off in 5 minutes to go to NYC. I guess they'll have a bond hearing Monday," Brodsky said.

Andrew Abood, another attorney representing Peterson, released a statement Thursday evening, the Tribune reported.

"Drew has steadfastly maintain (sic) his innocence regarding the rumor and innuendo that has circulated regarding the unfortunate death of Kathleen. Although he is disappointed with the decision of the state, he looks forward to the opportunity to once and for all prove his innocence in a court of law," he said.

Peterson has been a suspect in the disappearance of his 23-year-old wife Stacy Peterson, who vanished on Oct. 28, 2007, from her Bolingbrook, Ill., home.

In the months following Stacy Peterson's disappearance, Savio's body was exhumed and her 2004 bathtub drowning death was re-classified as a homicide.

Nick Savio, Kathleen's brother, told ABC 7 state police informed his sister Susan that Peterson was arrested on Thursday.

"My sister gave me a call, I just got out of work. She gave me a call and said, you know what, Nick? They are arresting Drew. We didn't know what for. The state police had been telling us the day was coming. We kept hearing it for about eight months. I'm almost in tears here. It's been so hard for our family," he said.

Pam Bosco, spokesperson for Stacy Peterson's family, told ABC 7 that the arrest was long anticipated by the family.

"We have dreamed about it. We have been patient over it. Now that it's here, it's almost a little bit calm," Bosco said.

Martin Glink, the Savio family's attorney, said the family hoped Peterson would be charged.

"We're very happy that the wheels of justice have continued to move and they are pointing in his direction," Glink told ABC 7.

Savio's family filed a wrongful death lawsuit last month, alleging Peterson downed her in the bathtub.

Kathleen Savio's family has long voiced suspicions about the circumstances surrounding her 2004 death, especially following the disappearance of Peterson's fourth wife, Stacy.

For more than a year, Peterson's attorney has said he anticipated the family would file a lawsuit and suggested it was imminent after an appellate court this year upheld a lower court's decision to take control of Savio's estate away from Peterson and give it her father Henry Savio and her sister, Anna Doman.

The lawsuit seeks more than $100,000 and alleges Peterson killed Savio before a scheduled trial over the divorced couple's property.

Many of the allegations made in the lawsuit have been reported in the media ever since Stacy Peterson disappeared in October 2007.

The lawsuit alleges Peterson went to Savio's house on Feb. 28, 2004, to "brutally ... stalk, attack, repeatedly beat, then drown, decedent Kathleen Savio."

Savio survived the attack for an unknown period of time before drowning, the lawsuit says.

The lawsuit covers a lot of familiar ground, starting with how Savio's death, initially classified as an accidental drowning, was reclassified as a homicide after her body was exhumed and another autopsy conducted following Stacy Peterson's disappearance.

It also alleges that a few months before Stacy Peterson disappeared she told a pastor in October 2007 that she knew her husband killed Savio, an allegation reported in the media two months later.

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,519392,00.html (http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,519392,00.html)


Title: Drew Peterson charged with murder, authorities say
Post by: Carnut on May 07, 2009, 10:41:42 PM
Drew Peterson charged with murder, authorities say

(CNN) -- Drew Peterson, the former police sergeant who authorities call the prime suspect in the disappearance of his fourth wife, Stacy Peterson, has been indicted on murder charges related to his third wife, Kathleen Savio, the Illinois state attorney's office said.

 Illinois State Police said Peterson was taken into custody about 5:30 p.m. Thursday after a traffic stop near his home.

Police had staked out his home all day, said police Capt. Carl Dobrich, but waited for Peterson to leave to arrest him out of concern for his three children, who were inside the house.

Peterson, through his attorney, denied any wrongdoing in either case.

Wills County State's Attorney James Glasgow said he believes the case is strong and said Peterson is being held on $20 million bond.

"This is an extremely grave and serious matter and it is reflected in the bond," Glasgow said.

Peterson's attorney Joel Brodsky told CNN's Larry King he believed the bond was excessive and would seek a more "reasonable" bond, noting it was the most expensive bond he'd seen in 10 years.

Charles B. Pelkie, spokesman for the state's attorney in Will County, Illinois, said a grand jury indicted Peterson in the murder of Savio, whose death had been ruled an accidental drowning.

Brodsky said in a written statement that prosecutors won't be able to prove their case because "he didn't do it."

"There is no evidence that links Drew Peterson to the death of Kathleen Savio or anyone else for that matter," Brodsky said. "Drew did not harm Kathleen; he has said so from Day One. We're obviously disappointed a grand jury indicted him. But an indictment does not mean guilt."

Pelkie said the grand jury continues to meet and is studying the possibility of charges in Stacy Peterson's disappearance.

After Stacy Peterson went missing in October 2007, media frenzy and police scrutiny on Peterson revealed Savio had died mysteriously a few years earlier during a nasty divorce.

Savio died just before the division of the marital assets was finalized, making Drew Peterson the sole beneficiary.

Savio was found in the dry bathtub of her home. At the time, the death was ruled an accidental drowning. But her family continued to insist that Savio died as a result of foul play.

 The investigation into Stacy Peterson's disappearance brought renewed interest in Savio's death. Authorities exhumed Savio's body, further tests were conducted, and her death has now been ruled a "homicide staged to look like an accident."

Brodsky told King he believes the case has always been about circumstantial evidence and that he will bring a pathologist to trial who will say Savio died from an accidental drowning.

"I think the jury's going to see that, in fact, this always has been an accidental death and still is an accidental death," Brodsky told King.

Kathleen Savio's brother, Nick, told CNN affiliate WLS-TV he received a call from his sister saying Peterson had been arrested.

"The state police had been telling us the day was coming," he told WLS-TV. "We kept hearing it for about eight months. I'm almost in tears here. It's been so hard for our family."

"Hopefully, we'll get the justice we've always been waiting for."

Martin Glink, attorney for the Savio family, said they were hopeful the grand jury felt there was enough evidence to charge Peterson.

"We're very happy that the wheels of justice have continued to move and they are pointing in his direction," Glink told WLS-TV.

The news was also bittersweet for Stacy Peterson's family, who continue to wait for news about her disappearance.

"We have anticipated this coming. We have dreamed about it. We have been patient over it," Pam Bosco, spokesperson for Stacy Peterson's family told WLS-TV. "Now that it's here, it's almost a little bit calm. We're waiting for the storm to calm now. The calm before the storm."

Bosco said while she had not heard about any charges relating to Stacy Peterson's death, she was hopeful those charges would follow.

"We always said from the very beginning that Kathleen and Stacy had one thing in common -- and that was Drew Peterson," she said. "So, hopefully, we'll have news soon about Stacy, too."

Ernie Raines is also relieved about the arrest. His daughter, Christina Raines, is dating Peterson and was living with him before his arrest. Ernie Raines told CNN's Anderson Cooper he was with his daughter and Peterson as recently as last week, when they talked about going to Las Vegas, Nevada, and getting married.

Thursday night he spoke with his daughter after the arrest.

"My daughter was terrified, very emotional, upset," Ernie Raines said. "And I tried to tell her from the beginning that this was going to happen, be prepared."

Ernie Raines said more than anything, when he heard about the arrest, he was relieved.

"I'm glad justice finally came -- before he hurt my daughter," he said.

 Police put Peterson's three minor children in the custody of the state's children and family service department. His adult son was contacted, at Peterson's request, to take them, according to Capt. Dobrich.

Dobrich said Peterson cooperated with police during his arrest.

http://www.cnn.com/2009/CRIME/05/07/peterson.murder.arrest/index.html (http://www.cnn.com/2009/CRIME/05/07/peterson.murder.arrest/index.html)


Title: Peterson jokes, chews gum at court appearance
Post by: Carnut on May 09, 2009, 03:45:37 PM
Peterson jokes, chews gum at court appearance

(CNN) -- Drew Peterson, who was arrested this week in the death of his third wife, joked with the media about his jail jumpsuit and chewed gum throughout his first court appearance Friday.

 The 55-year-old former police officer flashed a broad smile and engaged in banter during the 10-yard walk to the courthouse.

Wearing an inmate uniform -- a bright-red short-sleeved shirt and pants, white socks and sandals -- Peterson had his hands and feet shackled as he arrived at the courtroom.

Asked how he was, he responded, "three squares a day and a spiffy outfit." He then held up the chains and said, "and I got the bling. Can't complain."

Peterson, who authorities call the prime suspect in the disappearance of his fourth wife, Stacy Peterson, was indicted on murder charges related to the death of his third wife, Kathleen Savio, the Illinois state attorney's office said.

 Peterson appeared in court Friday, but a judge delayed his arraignment until May 18.

Judge Richard Schoenstedt ordered the delay after Will County State's Attorney Jim Glasgow told him that Peterson's primary lawyer, Joel Brodsky, had asked for it because neither he nor Peterson's other attorney could attend Friday's hearing.

Peterson, chewing gum throughout the proceedings and speaking in a clear voice, told Schoenstedt that he knew both of his lawyers were out of town and that he had no objection to the delay.

Glasgow, who has said he will prosecute the case personally, said Brodsky told him that he expects to ask the judge for a reduction in Peterson's $20 million bail during the May 18 arraignment.

Illinois State Police said Peterson was taken into custody about 5:30 p.m. Thursday after a traffic stop near his home.

 Police had staked out his home all day, police Capt. Carl Dobrich said, but waited for Peterson to leave before arresting him out of concern for his three young children, who were in the house.

Peterson, through his attorney, denied any wrongdoing in either case.

Glasgow said he believes that the case is strong.

"This is an extremely grave and serious matter, and it is reflected in the bond," Glasgow said.

Brodsky told CNN's Larry King that he thought the bail was excessive and would seek a more "reasonable" amount, noting that it was the most expensive bail he'd seen in 10 years.

 Charles B. Pelkie, a spokesman for Glasgow, said a grand jury indicted Peterson in the murder of Savio, whose death had once been ruled an accidental drowning.

But Brodsky said in a statement that prosecutors won't be able to prove their case, because "he didn't do it."

"There is no evidence that links Drew Peterson to the death of Kathleen Savio or anyone else for that matter," Brodsky said. "Drew did not harm Kathleen; he has said so from Day One. We're obviously disappointed a grand jury indicted him. But an indictment does not mean guilt."

Pelkie said the grand jury continues to meet and is studying the possibility of charges in Stacy Peterson's disappearance.

 After Stacy Peterson went missing in October 2007, media and police scrutiny of Peterson revealed that Savio had died mysteriously during a nasty divorce a few years earlier.

Savio died just before the division of marital assets was finalized, making Drew Peterson the sole beneficiary.

Savio was found in the dry bathtub of her home. At the time, the death was ruled an accidental drowning. But her family continued to insist that Savio died as a result of foul play.

The investigation into Stacy Peterson's disappearance brought renewed interest in Savio's death. Authorities exhumed Savio's body, further tests were conducted, and her death was been ruled a "homicide staged to look like an accident."

Brodsky told King that he thinks the case has always been about circumstantial evidence and that he will bring a pathologist to trial who will say Savio died in an accidental drowning.

 "I think the jury's going to see that, in fact, this always has been an accidental death and still is an accidental death," Brodsky told King.

Kathleen Savio's brother, Nick, told CNN affiliate WLS that he received a call saying Peterson had been arrested.

 "The state police had been telling us the day was coming," he told WLS. "We kept hearing it for about eight months. I'm almost in tears here. It's been so hard for our family.

"Hopefully, we'll get the justice we've always been waiting for."

Martin Glink, attorney for the Savio family, said they had been hopeful the grand jury felt that there was enough evidence to charge Peterson.

"We're very happy that the wheels of justice have continued to move and they are pointing in his direction," Glink told WLS.

The news was bittersweet for Stacy Peterson's family, who continue to wait for news about her disappearance.

"We have anticipated this coming. We have dreamed about it. We have been patient over it," family spokeswoman Pam Bosco told WLS. "Now that it's here, it's almost a little bit calm. We're waiting for the storm to calm now. The calm before the storm."

Bosco said she was hopeful there would be charges in Stacy Peterson's case.

"We always said from the very beginning that Kathleen and Stacy had one thing in common, and that was Drew Peterson," she said. "So, hopefully, we'll have news soon about Stacy, too."

Ernie Raines is also relieved about the arrest. His daughter, Christina Raines, is dating Peterson and was living with him before his arrest.

Raines told CNN's Anderson Cooper that he was with his daughter and Peterson as recently as last week, when they talked about going to Las Vegas, Nevada, and getting married.

Thursday night, he spoke with his daughter after the arrest.

"My daughter was terrified, very emotional, upset," Raines said. "And I tried to tell her from the beginning that this was going to happen, be prepared."

Raines said that when he heard about the arrest, he was more relieved than anything.

"I'm glad justice finally came before he hurt my daughter," he said.

 Police put Peterson's three young children in the custody of the state's children and family service department. His adult son was contacted, at Peterson's request, to take them, according to Dobrich.

Dobrich said Peterson cooperated with police during his arrest.

http://www.cnn.com/2009/CRIME/05/08/drew.peterson.murder/index.html (http://www.cnn.com/2009/CRIME/05/08/drew.peterson.murder/index.html)


Title: Re: Stacy Peterson / Drew Peterson Case
Post by: Sue on May 09, 2009, 05:50:19 PM
Drew is such a piece of shit


Title: Peterson Defends Cavalier Attitude After Arrest
Post by: Carnut on May 15, 2009, 12:23:50 PM
Peterson Defends Cavalier Attitude After Arrest

 Former suburban Chicago police sergeant Drew Peterson defended his glib attitude toward his arrest on charges of killing his third wife in a televised interview that aired on Friday.

Speaking by phone from the Will County Jail, Peterson told NBC's Matt Lauer on Friday's "Today" show that he deals with stressful situations with humor and it's not in his nature to hide.

Peterson, 55, called his handcuffs "bling" and his red jail jumpsuit "spiffy" as he was led into court last week. Lauer asked Peterson if he worries that such remarks will make him seem unsympathetic.

Peterson said that "there's no book written" on how he is supposed to act, and he doesn't think it would be better if he had tears in his eyes.

Peterson is being held on $20 million bond in third wife Kathleen Savio's mysterious bathtub death. He also is a suspect in the disappearance of his fourth wife, Stacy Peterson, who vanished in October 2007.

The former Bolingbrook, Ill., police officer hasn't been charged in Stacy's disappearance. But he now is accused of killing Savio, who was found dead in a dry bathtub at her home on March 1, 2004.

Her death was initially declared an accident, but was ruled a homicide after another autopsy.

The prosecutor in the case has said he intends to introduce evidence at trial that would allow Savio "to testify from the grave" through third-party statements uncovered during the investigation.

Peterson's arrest and indictment were the result of 18 months of intensive police work that garnered hundreds of leads and produced thousands of pages of investigative reports, according to authorities.

Stacy Peterson has never been found.

Drew Peterson is being held at the Will County Adult Detention Facility in Joliet, Ill. His children were taken by police and transferred to family services.

Peterson was arrested around 5:30 p.m. May 7 after state police surrounded his car at an intersection near his home in Bolingbrook. He was alone at the time.

“I guess I should have returned those library books,” Peterson said as he was being taken into state police headquarters.

State police later searched Peterson's home.

Savio's family has long voiced suspicions about the circumstances surrounding her death, especially following the disappearance of Stacy Peterson. They filed a wrongful death lawsuit against Peterson last month.

The lawsuit seeks more than $100,000 and alleges Peterson killed Savio before a scheduled trial over the divorced couple's property.

The lawsuit alleges Peterson went to his third wife's house on Feb. 28, 2004, to "brutally ... stalk, attack, repeatedly beat, then drown, decedent Kathleen Savio."

Savio survived the attack for an unknown period of time before drowning, the lawsuit says.

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,520277,00.html (http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,520277,00.html)


Title: Drew Peterson's Words Could Play Big Role in Trial
Post by: Carnut on May 17, 2009, 02:14:30 PM
Drew Peterson's Words Could Play Big Role in Trial

 Drew Peterson might not take the stand if he goes to trial on charges alleging he killed his third wife, but his words could still play a big role as prosecutors try to put him away.

The former police officer, facing arraignment Monday on first-degree murder charges in the 2004 drowning death of ex-wife Kathleen Savio, has never shied from the media that has followed his every move since his fourth wife, Stacy, vanished in 2007 and he became a suspect in Savio's death.

In fact, he's seemed to relish the spotlight, often giving reporters a joke or smart-aleck remark — like smiling and calling his handcuffs "bling" when he was led to his first court appearance earlier this month.

And that, attorneys say, could be one of Peterson's biggest problems.

"If one wife goes missing and (another) wife is dead, those aren't usually the subject of jokes," said Roy Black, a defense attorney whose clients have included Rush Limbaugh and William Kennedy Smith. "People are going to think this is a very bizarre person, who's more likely to have committed murder than someone who is in mourning."

Peterson is accused of drowning Savio, who was found dead in a dry bathtub in 2004 with a gash on the back of her head. Her death was initially ruled an accident, but after Stacy Peterson went missing Savio's body was exhumed and authorities ruled her death a homicide staged to look like an accident.

Marilyn Brenneman, a senior deputy prosecutor in Seattle's King County, once won a murder conviction after showing jurors a video of a news conference given by a man charged in a drowning death.

"We used it to show his attitude was blase," she said. "He was kind of wooden and didn't show any emotion. ... That is not really an appropriate response."

Defense attorney Mark Geragos has seen what a defendant's own words can do to a case. One of his most famous clients, Scott Peterson, was convicted of murdering his pregnant wife, Laci, after a trial in which jurors watched three television interviews he gave before he retained Geragos.

The interviews included Peterson saying he told police about his affair with another woman the first night his wife was reported missing and saying he told his mistress the truth about being married within several days of the disappearance. Neither was true. And by the time those clips played in court, jurors knew from other testimony that they were watching Scott Peterson lie.

"Some of the most compelling evidence the jury can see is prejudicial but unfortunately it's compelling," Geragos said.

In San Diego in 2007, Cynthia Sommer was convicted of first-degree murder in the slaying of her husband after prosecutors based much of their case on the idea that she did not behave like a grieving widow.

The jury heard about how Sommer used insurance money to pay for breast implants, took part in wet T-shirt contests and had casual sex with other men.

"This case was all about a grieving unbecoming of a widow," said Sommer's attorney, Allen Bloom. "That's all it was, it was a lifestyle, it was painting her with a scarlet letter."

However, a year later a judge dismissed the charges that Sommer poisoned her husband with arsenic because new tests revealed there was no arsenic in his system.

Even if the videos of Drew Peterson's public comments don't make it into trial, they can still have an effect.

"Whether it's admissible or not is one thing ..." said Joe Tacopina, a prominent New York defense attorney. "But it's certainly admissible in the court of public opinion, which is your jury pool."

Peterson's attorney said joking around is how his client deals with stress.

"In a tight, uncomfortable situation, you're gonna get humor and wise cracks," said attorney Joel Brodsky, who is expected to ask a judge Monday to reduce Peterson's bail, which is set at $20 million.

Peterson said he wouldn't behave any other way.

"Would it be better if I hid my head down and tried to hide my face and hunched and had tears in my eyes?" he asked NBC's Matt Lauer during a telephone interview aired on "Today" on Friday. "I mean, no, that's just not me."

Almost since the day Stacy Peterson vanished in October 2007, Peterson has done things like joke about his fourth wife's menstrual cycles and agree to take part in a radio "Win a Date With Drew" contest. A radio station rejected the contest idea.

Brodsky said he is confident that if Peterson stands trial the jury will do the right thing.

"My experience is that juries usually work very hard to put away biases and look at the facts," he said.

But Bloom said even though most jurors want to do the right thing, they can still end up being swayed by things that have nothing to do with evidence.

"They say they won't, but they can be impacted by innuendo, suspicion, speculation and moral judgment," he said.

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,520449,00.html (http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,520449,00.html)


Title: Re: Stacy Peterson / Drew Peterson Case
Post by: bleachedblack on May 21, 2009, 09:26:02 AM
Body stirs missing-women cases
Families of Stebic, Peterson await autopsy results


May 21, 2009

(http://www.chicagotribune.com/media/photo/2009-05/47040215.jpg)
A cleanup crew working Wednesday afternoon on the Des Plaines River discovered badly decomposed human remains, igniting hope in the families of two missing Will County women that they might find closure.

An autopsy will be performed Thursday on the unidentified remains found along the banks of the river near Channahon, just west of Interstate Highway 55, an area where searchers have looked for Stacy Peterson since she disappeared Oct. 28, 2007.

Authorities would not discuss the condition of the remains, whether they were male or female, or if clothing was found on the body. Officials said there is no timetable as to when they will be able to make a positive identification.

There was no sign of the blue container in which Stacy Peterson's body had reportedly been carried out of her home, allegedly by her husband, Drew Peterson, and his stepbrother.

The crew found the body around 2:30 p.m. in brush on the river shoreline, said the manager of Mugzy's Hideout, a bar in the Big Basin Marina.

Speculation spread that the remains could also be Lisa Stebic, the Plainfield mother who disappeared in April 2007. Stacy Peterson's family was alerted to the discovery by state police.

"We've been called," said Pam Bosco, a spokeswoman for her family. "We're in contact by phone.

"We're just waiting to hear more information. For confirmation though, they said it's going to be a little bit of time."

Melanie Greenberg, a spokeswoman for Lisa Stebic's family, said: "If it is [her], the overwhelming feeling would be relief that we found her and that there is resolution."

Earlier, the state's attorney announced the special grand jury investigating the Peterson and Stebic cases had not returned indictments related to their disappearances.

Attorney Joel Brodsky visited Peterson on Wednesday night and acted unfazed by speculation the body could be Stacy's.

"I wish I had $10,000 for every time they pulled a body out of a river in the Chicago area," Brodsky said. "People will assume what they want to assume."

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/chi-body-search-21may21,0,1221131.story


Title: Re: Stacy Peterson / Drew Peterson Case
Post by: Sue on May 21, 2009, 10:16:40 AM
problems with this is  If it were Lisa or Stacy it would be human remains
NOT a decomposing body.. Little caylee was only gone 6 months and she was nothing but bones


Title: Change of Judge Granted in Drew Peterson's Murder Trial
Post by: Carnut on May 21, 2009, 02:32:59 PM
Change of Judge Granted in Drew Peterson's Murder Trial

 A change of judge was granted Thursday in the Illinois murder trial of former police officer Drew Peterson, charged with killing his third wife and staging it to look like an accidental drowning.

Prosecutors filed a motion earlier this week asking that Will County Judge Richard Schoenstedt be replaced on the grounds that he is biased against them.

They haven't elaborated, but Schoenstedt ruled against them in a gun case involving Peterson, prompting them to drop the charges.

Defense attorney Joel Brodsky contested the judge's removal during a hearing Thursday afternoon.

Peterson is charged with first-degree murder in the 2004 drowning death of his third wife, Kathleen Savio.

Brodsky also wants Peterson's $20 million bail to be reduced.

Brodsky entered a not guilty plea on Peterson's behalf Monday as his client stood silently in court, wearing a blue jail jumpsuit and shackles.

Brodsky told FOX News earlier this week before Peterson's court appearance that they would ask for the bond to be $500,000 or less.

"To say he is one sided is absolutely incorrect," Brodsky said of the prosecutors' claims, adding they will file an appeal that requests the state to give specific reasons for their request. "This is the chief judge for the criminal division for this county. This [the motion] is quite extraordinary."

Peterson has been in custody since his May 7 arrest on first-degree murder charges in Savio's death.

Her death was originally ruled an accident. But after Peterson's fourth wife, Stacy, disappeared in 2007, Savio's body was exhumed. Authorities reclassified the death as a homicide after an autopsy.

Savio's family alleged that authorities originally staged a cover-up, but after Stacy's death they couldn't turn a blind eye.

"My feeling is that because he's a cop, sometimes cops stick together," said her brother Nick Savio. "I think the first time the state police stuck together and it was probably a coverup. Drew knew alot of people."

He believes the motive for his sister's death was money.

"She was set to get half his pension and he didn't want to get his children taken away from him," Nick Savio said. "Finally, he is getting what he deserves."

Peterson, 55, has denied any involvement in Savio's death or Stacy Peterson's disappearance.

But his numerous media appearances, where he has gained a reputation for making smart-aleck remarks, could play a big role as prosecutors try to lock him up.

Peterson, of suburban Bolingbrook, has never shied from the media, seeming to relish the spotlight and often offering reporters a joke. As he was led to his first court appearance this month, he referred to his prison-issued jumpsuit as a "spiffy outfit."

His attorney told FOX News that they've told him making these comments would, "not be in his best interest," but Brodsky said Peterson maintains it's how he reacts to stress and pressure."

"He said it's almost an imvoluntary act," Brodsky said.

Peterson said he wouldn't behave any other way.

"Would it be better if I hid my head down and tried to hide my face and hunched and had tears in my eyes?" he asked NBC's Matt Lauer during a telephone interview aired on the "Today" show Friday. "I mean, no, that's just not me."

Melissa Doman said she thinks Peterson is starting to understand the severity of the charges.

"I've seen him walking around for five years with that smug smirk. It's gone," she said.

Attorneys say Peterson's mouth could be one of his biggest problems.

"If one wife goes missing and (another) wife is dead, those aren't usually the subject of jokes," said Roy Black, a defense attorney whose clients have included Rush Limbaugh and William Kennedy Smith. "People are going to think this is a very bizarre person, who's more likely to have committed murder than someone who is in mourning."

Peterson is accused of drowning Savio, who was found dead in a dry bathtub in 2004 with a gash on the back of her head. Her death originally was ruled an accident, but after Stacy Peterson went missing, Savio's body was exhumed and authorities ruled it a homicide staged to look like an accident.

Even if the videos of Drew Peterson's arrival in court or of his interviews don't make it into trial, they can still have an effect.

"Whether it's admissible or not is one thing ..." said Joe Tacopina, a prominent defense attorney in New York. "But it's certainly admissible in the court of public opinion, which is your jury pool."

Peterson's attorney said his client's spirits have not derailed by the motion to get a judge.

"He is rolling with the punches," said Brodsky. "As long as his children are doing OK, he can take whatever is thrown at him.

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,520983,00.html (http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,520983,00.html)


Title: Re: Stacy Peterson / Drew Peterson Case
Post by: iris44 on May 21, 2009, 10:32:29 PM
I don't think this timeline has been posted here yet:

Here is the timeline created by author and Herald News reporter Joe Hosey, based on his articles for the newspaper and his true crime sensation, "Fatal Vows: The Tragic Wives of Sergeant Drew Peterson."


All times are approximate.
Sunday, Oct. 28, 2007

3 to 4 a.m.: Bolingbrook police Sgt. Drew Peterson skipped out of his shift early, by his own admission, and returned home. He joined his sleeping wife in bed.

9 a.m.: Peterson's children woke him up. Peterson said he "believes" his wife Stacy was still in the house, but due to his sleepy state, did not fully trust his memory. Peterson did recollect his wife telling him she was leaving to help Bruce Zidarich, a friend of her sister, Cassandra Cales, paint the home of her brother, Yelton Cales, in Yorkville.

10:15 a.m.: Zidarich spoke on the phone with Stacy, for what turns out to be the last time. He said she sounded "depressed" and told him she had been lounging in bed. Stacy never showed up to paint.

11:55 a.m.: The Petersons' next-door-neighbor, Sharon Bychowski, said she called the Peterson home to offer the children some lollipops she had bought. Peterson's then-13 year old son Kristopher answered. Bychowski said Kristopher sounded disoriented and stumbled on his words. Peterson then took the phone, she said, and told her Stacy went to visit her grandfather and to run some errands.

1:15 p.m.: Peterson took three of his children, Kristopher, Anthony, then 4, and Lacy, then 2, over to Bychowski's house and asked her to watch them.

1:30 p.m.: Peterson returned and collects his children.

2 p.m.: Bychowski called Stacy's cell phone. The call went straight to voice mail. Bychowski found this highly unusual.

2:30 p.m.: Peterson called in sick from his shift that evening.

7 p.m.: Drew Peterson picked up his stepbrother, Thomas Morphey, from his home a few minutes away and headed to a Bolingbrook Starbucks. Peterson related to Morphey that he is having problems with his much younger fourth wife, Stacy, and asks for Morphey's help. Peterson drove Morphey to a nearby park, gave him his cell phone and left him there.

7:45 p.m.: Peterson's cell phone, left in Morphey's possession, rang. It showed Stacy's name on the caller ID. A second call came in soon after in the same manner.

8:30 p.m.: Peterson returned to the park, picked up Morphey and headed to the Peterson home.

8:40 p.m.: Morphey and Peterson carried a blue barrel downstairs from the master bedroom to the driveway and Peterson's Yukon Denali.

8:50 p.m.: Peterson dropped Morphey at his home.

9 p.m.: Peterson claimed Stacy called his cell phone to inform him she met another man and has abandoned her family.

10 p.m.: Morphey walked down the street to his friend Walter Martineck's house. He told Martineck he believes he helped dispose of Stacy Peterson's body.

11 p.m.: Cassandra Cales drove to the Peterson house. She found the driveway empty of vehicles. Cales spoke with Kristopher, who told her Peterson and Stacy fought, Stacy has left, and his father is out looking for her.

11:15 p.m.: Cales called Peterson's cell phone from the parking lot of a department store near the Peterson home. Cales said Peterson sounded out of breath and told her he was at his home. Cales said she had been outside his house shortly before she made the call and Peterson was nowhere to be found.

11:40 p.m.: Cales went to the Downers Grove Police Department to seek advice. She was sent to the Bolingbrook Police Department.

Midnight: Cales went to the Bolingbrook Police Department to report her sister missing.
Monday, Oct. 29, 2007

2:30 a.m.: Cales drove by the Peterson home again and saw both the Denali and Stacy's Pontiac Grand Prix in the driveway.

4 a.m.: Cales went to the state police District 5 headquarters in Lockport and reported her sister missing again. Later that morning, the state police took over the investigation from the Bolingbrook police.


Title: Prosecutor: Drew Peterson tried to hire a hitman to kill third wife
Post by: Carnut on May 22, 2009, 02:37:09 PM
Prosecutor: Drew Peterson tried to hire a hitman to kill third wife

(CNN) -- Prosecutors alleged Friday that Drew Peterson tried to hire a hitman to kill his third wife, Kathleen Savio, a spokesman for the Will County, Illinois, state attorney said.

 State's Attorney James Glasgow said during a bail reduction hearing Friday that Peterson tried to solicit a hitman for $25,000 to kill Savio, press secretary Charles Pelkie said.

Peterson has pleaded not guilty to a charge of first-degree murder in Savio's death.
advertisement

He has also been named a suspect in the disappearance of his fourth wife, Stacy Peterson.

Savio's death was originally deemed an accident, but after the case of the fourth wife sparked new questions, Savio's body was exhumed. A grand jury indicted Peterson this month on a charge of first-degree murder in her death.

http://www.cnn.com/2009/CRIME/05/22/drew.peterson/index.html (http://www.cnn.com/2009/CRIME/05/22/drew.peterson/index.html)


Title: Re: Stacy Peterson / Drew Peterson Case
Post by: Sue on May 22, 2009, 05:58:59 PM
sure glad this prick isnt getting out of jail anytime soon
they should put his ass in genral population


Title: Re: Stacy Peterson / Drew Peterson Case
Post by: iris44 on May 22, 2009, 11:37:43 PM
Below is a link to the Will County jail website.  You can type in "peterson" and his info comes up.  His housing location comes up "MM" which I believe is the Medical Center.  I have been told that since the jail is quite crowded, that is the only place he can be kept safe.  It's a small facility across the street from the back of the Will County Courthouse.


http://www.willcosheriff.com/pages/Cimis/search.asp


Title: Re: Stacy Peterson / Drew Peterson Case
Post by: katysmom on May 23, 2009, 06:09:49 AM
problems with this is  If it were Lisa or Stacy it would be human remains
NOT a decomposing body.. Little caylee was only gone 6 months and she was nothing but bones

Would the blue barrell (with no air) slowed down the decomposition process?  I know that after a while the body gases can blow the lid off, which if I remember correctly, is what happened in the Lacey Peterson case.  I'm praying it is Stacey to give the prosecution better ammo during the trial, but I'm also praying it is Lisa so Craig can finally be put away.  Who ever it turns out to be some family is finally going to be able to rest a little easier knowing where their loved one is.  I don't believe in "closure'....no family that goes through something like this will ever have complete closure; you just can't wipe out the memories.


Title: Re: Stacy Peterson / Drew Peterson Case
Post by: Puma on May 23, 2009, 09:12:05 PM
I don't think this was posted:  They are saying that the remains found earlier this week (see BB's 5/21 post) appear to be that of a woman, based on clothing found. 


Title: River body: Not Stacy Peterson or Lisa Stebic
Post by: Carnut on June 06, 2009, 01:09:04 PM
River body: Not Stacy Peterson or Lisa Stebic

-Erika Slife

The human remains discovered May 20 in the Des Plaines River were identified by authorities today as that of a male, ruling out speculation they could be those of missing Will County women Stacy Peterson or Lisa Stebic.

DNA testing by the Illinois State Police Forensic Crime Lab determined that the partial skeletal remains were that of an unidentified male, and authorities said an investigation is underway to find the identity of the person.

The remains, which consisted of a rib cage, spinal column, and partial left and right femur bones, were found by a clean-up crew working along the river near Channahon just west of Interstate Highway 55.

A preliminary autopsy performed last week could not determine whether the body was that of a man or woman, its race, or identity.

The remains included shreds of jeans containing a small amount of money, which a source said was about $20.

On Saturday, Illinois State Police found two more bones not far from where the body was discovered near Big Basin Marina. Those remains are with an anthropologist for evaluation, said State Police Sgt. Tom Burek. He declined to comment further.

Peterson vanished from her Bolingbrook home in October 2007, and Stebic disappeared from her Plainfield home in April 2007. Both lived not far from where the remains were found.

"I think we left ourselves open to this possibility. We're disappointed," Pam Bosco, a spokeswoman for Peterson's family, said today. "But we're still moving forward, doing the searches, doing the investigation. We're continuing. We're still hopeful that eventually we'll find Stacy."

Peterson's husband, Drew Peterson, is a suspect in her disappearance. The former Bolingbrook police sergeant is in jail on murder charges in the 2004 death of his previous wife, Kathleen Savio. Plainfield police have named Craig Stebic a "person of interest" in his wife's case. Both men deny any wrongdoing.

http://www.chicagobreakingnews.com/2009/05/des-plaines-river-remains-were-of-male.html (http://www.chicagobreakingnews.com/2009/05/des-plaines-river-remains-were-of-male.html)


Title: Court Denies Petition To Lessen Drew Peterson's $20 Million Bail
Post by: Carnut on June 06, 2009, 01:10:37 PM
Court Denies Petition To Lessen Drew Peterson's $20 Million Bail

CHICAGO —  A lawyer for Drew Peterson says an Illinois appeals court has denied a petition to lessen Peterson's $20 million bail.

Attorney Joel Brodsky expressed disappointment in the ruling from the Illinois Third District Appellate Court in a statement late Friday.

Brodsy says there may be another chance to request a reduction in bail. He says what he calls "the weakness of the State's case" will become clear.

Peterson, a former Bolingbrook police officer, has pleaded not guilty to first-degree murder in the 2004 death of his third wife, Kathleen Savio, whose body was found in a dry bathtub. Peterson is also a suspect in the disappearance of his fourth wife, Stacy.

Will County prosecutors say Peterson offered someone $25,000 to kill Savio, but then did it himself.

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,525292,00.html (http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,525292,00.html)


Title: Re: Stacy Peterson / Drew Peterson Case
Post by: Puma on August 21, 2009, 10:02:59 AM
Local news reports that Stacy Peterson's family is planning another search for her this weekend.  What I didn't hear is whether or not there was a tip or something that prompted this. 


Title: Re: Stacy Peterson / Drew Peterson Case
Post by: iris44 on August 21, 2009, 10:03:50 PM
Local news reports that Stacy Peterson's family is planning another search for her this weekend.  What I didn't hear is whether or not there was a tip or something that prompted this. 

On a local radio station they said the search was today (Friday) and that they were searching a certain area due to new information received.


Title: Re: Stacy Peterson / Drew Peterson Case
Post by: Puma on August 22, 2009, 08:42:49 AM
Thanks Iris.  I don't always listen to the 10:00 o'clock news and hadn't heard anything else. 


Title: Re: Stacy Peterson / Drew Peterson Case
Post by: iris44 on August 23, 2009, 01:18:13 PM
Thanks Iris.  I don't always listen to the 10:00 o'clock news and hadn't heard anything else. 

You are welcome, Puma.  I also read yesterday that the area they searched was by the Ikea in Bolingbrook.  A women had reported a possible Drew sighting in that area and the area had finally dried enough to search.  It's a very swampy area and the searchers were walking through thigh high water at times.  They said there are still a few areas at that location they need to search.   I also read that family and friends conduct their own searches nearly every weekend.


Title: Re: Stacy Peterson / Drew Peterson Case
Post by: Sue on October 02, 2009, 02:57:40 PM
JOLIET, Ill. —  A judge denied a request Friday to move the murder trial of former Bolingbrook, Ill., police sergeant Drew Peterson.

Judge Stephen White said Friday that Peterson can get a fair trial in Will County.

Peterson's attorney, Joel Brodsky, had argued that pretrial publicity had tainted the local jury pool.

Click here for photos.

Click here to read the charges against Peterson.

Peterson has pleaded not guilty to a first-degree murder charge in the 2004 death of his third wife, Kathleen Savio, whose body was found in a dry bathtub.

Brodsky is also seeking to have the new Illinois hearsay law declared unconstitutional.

White said he'd rule on that motion later Friday.

Prosecutors say the law would allow Savio to "testify from the grave" by admitting into evidence her past statements that she believed Peterson wanted her dead.

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,559282,00.html?test=latestnews


Title: Peterson's defense team challenges 'Drew's law'
Post by: Carnut on January 19, 2010, 03:51:45 PM
Peterson's defense team challenges 'Drew's law'

By Stephanie Chen, CNN

Stacy Peterson had disturbing things to say about her husband, Drew Peterson.

She is still missing, but her statements about former Bolingbrook police Sgt. Drew Peterson, who is accused of murdering his previous wife, may start to come out in court at a crucial pretrial hearing that begins Tuesday.

Her statements, according to court documents, are likely to include her suspicions and fears of Peterson.

At the center of the debate is whether hearsay evidence can be used at Peterson's trial. Hearsay is what one person says to another, outside of a courtroom setting. Because courts prefer to hear from the original source, the person who hears a statement is usually not permitted to tell judges and juries about the statement.

Peterson is accused of murdering his third wife, Kathleen Savio. Her body was found in an empty bathtub in March 2004, and her death initially was ruled an accidental drowning. Her death was reinvestigated after Stacy Peterson's disappearance and then was ruled to be a homicide. Drew Peterson has been charged with first-degree murder. He denies the charges.

If prosecutors get their way, Stacy Peterson will haunt her husband's murder trial.

In 2004, the U.S. Supreme Court decided in the case Crawford v. Washington that hearsay evidence violates a defendant's Sixth Amendment right to confront the witnesses against him or her.

That case added hurdles for the use of hearsay evidence, according to legal analysts.

But courts have been establishing exceptions to the hearsay laws in cases in which witnesses are silenced. And the list of exceptions has grown over the years, especially if the hearsay can be used to show a witness or victim's state of mind. In those cases, jurors are warned not to automatically consider the statement as truthful.

Illinois passed a law in 2008 -- dubbed "the Drew Peterson law" or "Drew's law" by the media -- that allows hearsay evidence if prosecutors believe the victim was killed to prevent his or her testimony.

The defense maintains in its own motions that the law unfairly targets Drew Peterson because it was passed after the investigation was launched. In a legal response, prosecutor James W. Glasgow called the defense claim "a thinly veiled effort to sway the court into believing that this statute pertains exclusively to this prosecution."

Stacy Peterson was 23 when she vanished in October 2007. According to the prosecution, she had voiced doubts about Savio's demise and told others before she vanished that she feared the same fate.

After Stacy Peterson's disappearance, the state performed a second autopsy on Savio, concluding in November 2007 that her death was a homicide. A third autopsy was performed at the request of the Savio family. The private medical examiner determined the cuts, lacerations and bruises on her body indicated a struggle.

Drew Peterson was charged last year with first-degree murder and held on $20 million bond. He pleaded not guilty. He has not been charged in Stacy Peterson's disappearance.

Stacy Peterson made statements regarding Drew Peterson's whereabouts the night of Savio's death, according to a pastor and other potential witnesses.

Six years after Savio's death, prosecutors also intend to introduce her words through family members who recall their conversations with her, as well as through letters she wrote to police.

The hearings, which could last a month, will determine the merit and relevance of the hearsay statements. As many as 60 witnesses may testify, according to CNN affiliate WLS-TV in Chicago.

James Carey, a law professor at Loyola University law school in Chicago, said prosecutors must prove that Drew Peterson intentionally got rid of Stacy Peterson to keep her from testifying.

Drew Peterson's attorneys are arguing that Illinois' new hearsay law is unconstitutional. The new law was passed only after Peterson's case gained media attention, the defense argues.

"Having newly-minted evidence, but not the evidence to prosecute anyone for it, the Will County State's Attorney decided to draft a new law," wrote Drew Peterson's attorney, Joel A. Brodsky. He was unavailable for comment Monday, an office assistant said.

It is not yet clear what evidence prosecutors are seeking to present. Their motion was filed under seal.

However the court decides on the Peterson evidence, an appeal is likely and the precedents could become legal landmarks.

"This other witness may truthfully be saying what the person said, but how do we know what the person said is true?" said Steven Beckett, director of trial advocacy at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Beckett said hearsay evidence is a serious disadvantage to the defense because they cannot cross-examine the person being quoted.

There are no eyewitnesses or physical evidence to link Drew Peterson to Savio's death, his attorneys argue.

"I think the jury's going to see that, in fact, this always has been an accidental death and still is an accidental death," Brodsky told CNN's Larry King last year.

Savio's family has been hopeful the new law will help prove Drew Peterson's involvement in their daughter's case.

"We hope it's going to come out the right way," her father, Henry Savio, told CNN reporters in 2009, shortly after Drew Peterson was charged.

http://www.cnn.com/2010/CRIME/01/19/illinois.drew.peterson.hearsay/index.html (http://www.cnn.com/2010/CRIME/01/19/illinois.drew.peterson.hearsay/index.html)


Title: Re: Stacy Peterson / Drew Peterson Case
Post by: yapperz1 on January 21, 2010, 08:04:21 PM
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20100122/ap_on_re_us/us_drew_peterson

Witness: Peterson indicated he'd kill his 4th wife

By DON BABWIN, Associated Press Writer Don Babwin, Associated Press Writer – 58 mins ago
JOLIET, Ill. – The stepbrother of a former Illinois police officer accused of killing his third wife told a hushed courtroom Thursday that he believed he might have helped his relative dispose of the body of his fourth wife, who has not been seen for more than two years.

Thomas Morphey testified at a hearing to decide whether prosecutors can use "hearsay" evidence to try and prove allegations that Drew Peterson killed his third wife, Kathleen Savio, in 2004. Peterson hasn't been charged in the 2007 disappearance of his fourth wife, Stacy, but authorities say he is the only suspect.

While the Will County hearing is about the death of Savio, Thursday's testimony focused on the day Stacy Peterson disappeared. Prosecutors would not say why Morphey was being asked to testify about Stacy Peterson, but Will County state's attorney's office spokesman Chuck Pelkie said the reasons would become clear in the proceedings.

In a packed but quiet courtroom, Morphey said Peterson suggested when they talked on Oct. 27, 2007, that he intended to kill Stacy because she planned to divorce him, win custody of their children and take Peterson's money.

Morphey said he drank heavily the next day.

"I just heard someone was going to murder somebody else," Morphey explained.

Peterson brought Morphey back to his Bolingbrook home, went into a master bedroom and rolled out a large blue barrel that Morphey estimated weighed up to 150 pounds.

"He had me grab an end, he grabbed the other end and we proceeded down the stairs," Morphey testified. "It felt warm."

Morphey stopped short of saying that Peterson directly admitted murdering Stacy and he said the two men never talked about what was in the barrel. Earlier in the day, Morphey testified he had told Peterson that he always assumed he had killed Savio, but that Peterson denied it.

Savio's body was found in an empty bathtub in her home in 2004. Her death had initially been ruled an accidental drowning — until Stacy Peterson's disappearance led officials to exhume Savio's body, conduct another autopsy and conclude Savio was the victim of a homicide.

The story of the blue barrel has been central in Stacy Peterson's case. Numerous search parties over the years, including divers, have focused on finding it, but it has never turned up.

In court, Morphey said he had not wanted to go with Peterson, in part because he didn't want anything to do with what Peterson did. Morphey did not explain why he agreed to help him.

According to his testimony, the two men took the barrel, put it in Peterson's SUV and Peterson drove Morphey home.

"'He said, 'This never happened,'" Morphey testified. "I said, 'I won't tell a soul.'"

Nevertheless, Morphey said he later told his girlfriend, brother and a neighbor. He said he was stressed out, nervous and drinking more than normal.

Morphey said he didn't contact the authorities because he wasn't sure the incident would be handled fairly due to Peterson's job.

"He was a police officer," Morphey said. "I thought, 'What would be the point of calling 911?'"

Morphey said his fear led him to overdose on the anti-anxiety drug Xanax in an attempt to end his life.

"I felt everything was coming down on me," he said. "I'm still scared to death."

In a cross-examination, Peterson's attorneys raised questions about Morphey's mental state and whether was a credible witness.

Morphey suffers from a bipolar disorder and has admitted to drinking too much as well as problems with drugs. On Thursday prosecutors presented evidence that buttressed what Morphey said happened. That included video footage and witness interviews showing that both men made a trip to Starbucks around the time of the alleged blue barrel incident.

Peterson's stormy marriage with Savio was mentioned Thursday in afternoon testimony.

A son from Peterson's first marriage to Carol Brown described watching Peterson in 1993 dragging Savio into the house by her hair.

"She was screaming for help," said Eric Peterson, who described Savio as drunk. "He was pulling her down the stairs."

Eric Peterson, who once spent weekends with Savio and Peterson, has been estranged from his father since 1993.


Title: Neighbor Says Stacy Peterson Said 'I'm Already Dead'
Post by: Carnut on January 25, 2010, 10:34:38 PM
Neighbor Says Stacy Peterson Said 'I'm Already Dead'

JOLIET, Ill. —  The fourth wife of former Illinois police officer Drew Peterson was sure her husband would kill her, even telling a neighbor days before her disappearance in 2007 that "I'm already dead," according to testimony at a hearing on Monday.

The neighbor sobbed uncontrollably at times as she spoke during the hearing meant to determine what, if any, "hearsay" evidence prosecutors can use during Peterson's upcoming trial on charges he murdered his third wife, Kathleen Savio, in 2004.

Sharon Bychowski told the court that she found Stacy Peterson, then 23, crying outside her suburban Chicago home. She explained how she had packed 10 boxes of Drew Peterson's clothes and asked her husband, 30 years her senior, to leave. But he'd refused.

"She said, 'If I disappear, Sharon, it's not an accident. He killed me,"' a visibly shaken Bychowski testified.

As Stacy Peterson described how she feared for her life, Bychowski advised her to put what she was saying in writing.

"It doesn't matter," Bychowski said Peterson told her. "I'm already dead. He's going to kill me."

At one point, the judge called a brief recess to allow Bychowski to regain her composure.

Peterson has pleaded not guilty in Savio's 2004 death. Officials exhumed her body and ruled her death a homicide only after Stacy Peterson vanished three years later. He hasn't been charged in her disappearance, but authorities say he's the only suspect.

Peterson, wearing a suit and sporting a full beard, listened attentively during Monday's proceedings — occasionally leaning to consult with his attorneys.

The focus of the pre-trial hearing, now in its second week, is the possible use of "hearsay" evidence in the Savio case.

Hearsay, or statements not based on the direct knowledge of a witness, usually isn't admissible in court. Illinois judges can allow it in murder trials if prosecutors prove a defendant may have killed a witness to prevent them from testifying. There's little available forensic evidence in Savio's case, so prosecutors are expected to rely on statements Savio allegedly made to others saying she feared Peterson could kill her.

But Bychowski is the latest witness to testify at length about Stacy Peterson.

She testified Monday that Stacy Peterson, despite expressing fears for her own life, never said anything about Savio's death or that she may have suspected Drew Peterson of killing Savio. Drew Peterson and Savio had divorced, and he had already married Stacy Peterson before Savio died.

Bychowski also testified that Stacy Peterson talked at length about her intention to divorce Peterson.

"She didn't love him anymore," Bychowski said. She added that, for Stacy Peterson, "having sex with him made her skin crawl."

Drew Peterson tried to dissuade his young wife from leaving by showering her with gifts, including a motorcycle and a ring, as well as by paying for breast enhancement surgery, Stacy Peterson allegedly told Bychowski. But holding up the ring at one point, she said, "'He thinks he's going to keep me. No way,"' Bychowski recalled.

Drew Peterson was so possessive of Stacy, he even installed a satellite GPS tracking system in her cell phone to monitor her movements by computer, Bruce Zidarich — a then-boyfriend of Stacy Peterson's sister, Cassandra Cales — also testified Monday.

In the initial investigation into Savio's 2004 death, retired Illinois State Police Sgt. Patrick Collins also testified last week that he never considered the possibility of murder. He said he never collected any forensics evidence from the home where her body was found in a bathtub.

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,583884,00.html (http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,583884,00.html)


Title: Witness Testifies Peterson Wanted Him to Kill Third Wife
Post by: Carnut on January 28, 2010, 04:35:10 PM
Witness Testifies Peterson Wanted Him to Kill Third Wife

JOLIET, Ill. —  Months before Drew Peterson's ex-wife Kathleen Savio was found dead in her bathtub the former police sergeant asked a one-time co-worker if he could find someone to "have his third wife taken care of," the co-worker testified Thursday.

Jeff Pachter said Peterson told him during a ride in Peterson's squad car in the winter of 2003 that he'd pay Pachter $25,000 and he didn't care how Pachter divided the money. Pachter said that while Peterson never used the words kill or murdered, "I thought it was to have her murdered."

Pachter said he didn't take Peterson's offer seriously, saying he simply responded, "OK," but did nothing about it.

The testimony is part of a hearing to determine what "hearsay" evidence prosecutors can present to jurors when Drew Peterson stands trial in Savio's death.

Peterson, 56, a former Bolingbrook police officer, has pleaded not guilty to first-degree murder in Savio's death. He is also considered the only suspect in the 2007 disappearance of his fourth wife, Stacy Peterson.

Pachter said Peterson explained to him that he asked Pachter partly because Pachter works in a dangerous section of Joliet. Pachter said he understood that to mean Peterson believed he would be able to find a drug dealer or gang member to carry out the job.

Pachter, who said he met Peterson when the two worked for a cable company, is a convicted sex offender who acknowledged he owed his bookie $1,000 at the time and had marital problems. Prosecutors suggested in their questions that Peterson chose Pachter because he wouldn't be the kind of person who authorities would believe over the word of a police officer.

Pachter said he hadn't heard about Savio's death in March 2004 until he telephoned Peterson the following July to ask about Peterson's fourth wife, Stacy, and the baby she had recently delivered. Pachter said Peterson said during the call, "By the way, the favor that I asked you, I don't need it anymore."

He said Peterson explained that Savio had fallen in her bathtub, hit her head and died.

Peterson has not been charged in Stacy Peterson's disappearance, but much of the testimony has centered on her disappearance as prosecutors attempt to establish a link between the two cases.

Earlier Thursday, Stacy Peterson's sister Cassandra Cales testified that two days before Stacy Peterson disappeared she told Cales she was afraid of Drew Peterson.

"She said she feared for her life and if anything ever happened to her, Drew did something to her," Cales said.

In previous testimony, a neighbor of Stacy and Drew Peterson testified that shortly before she disappeared, Stacy Peterson told her the same thing.

Cales said when Stacy Peterson told her about her plans to divorce Peterson and leave with her children, Cales became frightened. Cales said she mentioned to Stacy Peterson that Savio's death was "kind of weird." But Stacy Peterson didn't respond, Cales said.

Cales also testified that on the night she reported her sister missing, Drew Peterson told her that Stacy had left him for another man and had taken $25,000.

More than 30 witnesses have testified in the hearing, which is in its seventh day and is expected to last at least another week.

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,584169,00.html (http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,584169,00.html)


Title: Pathologist Testifies Peterson's Ex-Wife Didn't Die in Fall
Post by: Carnut on February 05, 2010, 06:37:06 PM
Pathologist Testifies Peterson's Ex-Wife Didn't Die in Fall

JOLIET, Ill. —  A pathologist who concluded that the death of Drew Peterson's ex-wife was a homicide and not an accident as first determined testified Friday that her injuries weren't consistent with a fall in a bathtub.

Dr. Larry Blum, in his first public comments since the 2007 autopsy of Kathleen Savio, said he didn't think bruises on her body and a laceration to the back of her head came from a single fall. Savio's body was found slumped forward in a dry bathtub in 2004, and Blum said that her position wasn't consistent with a fall in the tub.

"There was no blood, hair or tissue on the tub," he said. "So the evidence doesn't bare that out."

Blum said Savio did drown but her death was not accidental, as another pathologist initially found.

"It was my opinion that it was a homicide," Blum said.

Peterson, a 56-year-old former Bolingbrook police officer, has pleaded not guilty to first-degree murder in the death of his third wife, Savio. Her body was exhumed in 2007 following the disappearance of Peterson's fourth wife, Stacy Peterson. Drew Peterson has not been charged in Stacy Peterson's disappearance, but authorities say he is a suspect.

Blum's findings will be at the center of the courtroom battle between Will County prosecutors and Peterson's attorneys, who argue that Savio's death was accidental.

Blum testified at a hearing to determine what hearsay evidence will be allowed at Peterson's upcoming trial. Hearsay, or statements not based on the direct knowledge of a witness, usually isn't admissible in court. But Illinois judges can allow it in murder trials if prosecutors prove a defendant may have killed a witness to prevent him or her from testifying.

There's little available forensic evidence in Savio's case, so prosecutors are expected to rely on statements Savio allegedly made to others saying she feared Peterson could kill her.

Blum, who said he laid down in Savio's tub as part of his investigation, testified the injury to the back of Savio's head may have been made shortly after her death and not as a result of a fall. He also pointed to a wound in the area of Savio's diaphragm as one that wouldn't have been caused in a fall.

"The bruise was deep, down to the bone," he said.

He also agreed with Will County State's Attorney James Glasgow's suggestion that the diaphragm injury might have been caused by what Glasgow called a "bear hug."

Blum also testified that Savio had no measurable drugs or alcohol in her system when she died — an effort to head off the argument defense attorneys have raised that perhaps Savio was in a condition that would have made a fall more likely.

Earlier in the day, Mary Parks, who studied nursing with Savio, testified about a day in late 2003 when Savio showed her red marks on her neck and told her Peterson made them.

"She told me her ex-husband had come into the house and had pinned her down," Parks testified.

Parks said Savio told her that during the incident Peterson told Savio, "Why don't you just die?"

She also said that Savio told her Peterson was intent on leaving her with nothing in the couple's divorce — but that even leaving her without any money, a share of the business the two owned, child support or custody of their two sons wouldn't have been enough for him.

"Kathy was very sure that if she gave up every cent ... that her ex-husband still would not leave her alone," Parks said.

Parks said she contacted prosecutors after Savio was found dead but was told there was no investigation into the case.

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,584977,00.html (http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,584977,00.html)


Title: Peterson's Harley up for sale
Post by: Carnut on May 12, 2010, 03:18:14 PM
Peterson's Harley up for sale

May 12, 2010 (WLS) -- Drew Peterson's Harley-Davidson motorcycle is up for sale on eBay as he awaits his murder trial.

The asking price is $50,000. And Peterson may autograph the bike. The selling price almost the exact amount that his attorneys say is needed for trial costs.

Peterson is charged in the 2004 death of his third wife, Kathleen Savio.

Peterson's lawyers say finances are not the main factor in putting the Harley on sale. They say Peterson just doesn't expect to be riding the bike this summer.

http://abclocal.go.com/wls/story?section=news/local&id=7437493 (http://abclocal.go.com/wls/story?section=news/local&id=7437493)


Title: Re: Stacy Peterson / Drew Peterson Case
Post by: cp405 on June 05, 2010, 07:49:33 AM
Cops May Have Found Body of Drew Peterson's Wife

Originally posted Jun 4th 2010 9:52 PM PDT by TMZ Staff

There may be a huge break in the disappearance of Drew Peterson's fourth wife. TMZ has learned authorities believe they may know exactly where the body is buried, and then plan to dig for it tomorrow.

http://www.tmz.com/


Title: Re: Stacy Peterson / Drew Peterson Case
Post by: OldFart on June 05, 2010, 08:11:40 AM
WOW  !!!

Why the heck are they waiting to dig ??? 
Oh   I checked   Strong Thunderstorms expected there today !

Thanks CP


Title: Re: Stacy Peterson / Drew Peterson Case
Post by: katysmom on June 05, 2010, 09:40:15 AM
Drew never could keep his mouth shut; it was just a matter of time before he had to start bragging to someone.  Watch...his stupid lawyer is going to try to get it thrown out because the info came from an unreliable jailhouse snitch, even if it does turn out to be Stacey.


Title: Re: Stacy Peterson / Drew Peterson Case
Post by: OldFart on June 05, 2010, 10:02:42 AM
Hey Katysmom    :[db   [hp;

Long time no see... I hope things are good with you

 :vk}


Title: Re: Stacy Peterson / Drew Peterson Case
Post by: MumInOhio on June 05, 2010, 10:08:24 AM
Katys!  :vk}

Thanks cp!


Title: Re: Stacy Peterson / Drew Peterson Case
Post by: MumInOhio on June 05, 2010, 10:11:44 AM
Sources do confirm that law enforcement, using dogs, searched a hunting area east of Peoria Friday. They are set to return Saturday to dig in an specific area.

http://www.suntimes.com/news/2358222,drew-peterson-stacy-body-dig-peoria-060510.article


Title: Prosecutors delay Peterson murder trial for appeal
Post by: Carnut on July 07, 2010, 06:14:56 PM
Prosecutors delay Peterson murder trial for appeal

Joliet, Illinois (CNN) -- The murder trial of former Illinois police officer Drew Peterson will be postponed while prosecutors appeal a judge's ruling that keeps some witness statements out of court as hearsay, the state's attorney announced Wednesday.

Jury selection had been set to begin Thursday in Joliet, south of Chicago, but the appeal is likely to push back the start of the trial for weeks and perhaps months, said Will County State's Attorney James Glasgow.

"The people of the state of Illinois are entitled to a fair trial, and I intend to see that they get one," Glasgow said in a statement issued by his office Wednesday afternoon. "As state's attorney, I am obligated to appeal the judge's ruling to ensure that every legally admissible statement may be presented at trial."

Peterson has pleaded not guilty to first-degree murder in the 2004 death of his third wife, Kathleen Savio. Defense attorney Joel Brodsky told reporters the state's appeal is a tacit admission that "they don't have a case" without hearsay.

Peterson has been jailed for more than a year, and Brodsky said he will seek his immediate release now that the trial has been pushed back.

Circuit Judge Stephen White ruled Tuesday that he would not reconsider an earlier ruling that barred prosecutors from presenting a list of statements they had sought to use in their case. Glasgow argued that the judge should reverse that ruling because of a recent Illinois Supreme Court ruling, and he has asked a state appeals court to overturn White's order upholding his earlier decision.

White has kept details of the statements under wraps to keep them from potential jurors, who will be drawn from a pool of 240 people once proceedings begin.

Savio's death initially was ruled an accidental drowning, but her body was exhumed and re-examined in 2007 after the still-unsolved disappearance of Peterson's fourth wife, Stacy. The onetime Bolingbrook, Illinois, police sergeant denies any wrongdoing in either case.

http://www.cnn.com/2010/CRIME/07/07/illinois.peterson.trial/index.html (http://www.cnn.com/2010/CRIME/07/07/illinois.peterson.trial/index.html)


Title: No release for murder suspect Peterson, judge rules
Post by: Carnut on July 08, 2010, 05:21:41 PM
No release for murder suspect Peterson, judge rules

Joliet, Illinois (CNN) -- Former police officer Drew Peterson will remain in jail while prosecutors pursue an appeal that has delayed the start of his first-degree murder trial, a judge ruled Thursday.

Peterson's attorneys demanded his immediate release after prosecutors announced they would challenge Will County Circuit Judge Stephen White's refusal to reconsider a pre-trial ruling that barred them from introducing some witnesses' statements. Jury selection had been scheduled to start Thursday, but the appeal is likely to delay the trial for weeks, perhaps months.

Peterson has pleaded not guilty to first-degree murder in the 2004 death of his third wife, Kathleen Savio. A former police sergeant in Bolingbrook, on the outskirts of Chicago, Peterson has been held in lieu of $20 million bond since May 2009.

Savio's death initially was ruled an accidental drowning, but her body was exhumed and re-examined in 2007 after the still-unsolved disappearance of Peterson's fourth wife, Stacy. Peterson denies any wrongdoing in either case, and defense attorney Joel Brodsky told reporters Wednesday that the state's appeal is a tacit admission that "they don't have a case" without hearsay.

http://www.cnn.com/2010/CRIME/07/08/illinois.peterson.trial/index.html (http://www.cnn.com/2010/CRIME/07/08/illinois.peterson.trial/index.html)


Title: Judge dismisses Drew Peterson weapons charge
Post by: Carnut on October 01, 2010, 03:42:50 PM
Judge dismisses Drew Peterson weapons charge

JOLIET, Ill. –  A judge has dismissed a felony weapons charge against former suburban Chicago police officer Drew Peterson.

Peterson was charged with possession of an illegal firearm after authorities learned he gave a short-barreled rifle to his son for safe keeping.

Peterson is awaiting trial in the 2004 death of his third wife Kathleen Savio. He is also a suspect in the 2007 of his fourth wife Stacy Peterson. He has denied wrongdoing.

At Friday's hearing, Will County Judge Richard Schoenstedt said prosecutors didn't show that Peterson couldn't own the weapon that was seized in November 2007. It is the second time the judge has thrown out the charge.

Defense attorney Joel Brodsky says it was the right decision to make.

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2010/10/01/judge-dismisses-drew-peterson-weapons-charge/ (http://www.foxnews.com/us/2010/10/01/judge-dismisses-drew-peterson-weapons-charge/)


Title: Will Drew Peterson's wives speak from the grave?
Post by: Carnut on February 15, 2011, 01:49:57 PM
Will Drew Peterson's wives speak from the grave?

By Beth Karas,

(CNN) -- Drew Peterson's lawyers go to court on Wednesday for a hearing that could have a profound effect on the murder case against him.

At issue: whether the jury can consider statements two of his wives made about him to others. One of them, his ex, is dead and the other is missing and presumed dead.

Peterson, a former police sergeant from Bolingbrook, Illinois, is accused of killing his third wife, Kathleen Savio, in 2004 and remains under investigation in the October 2007 disappearance of his fourth wife, Stacy Peterson.

Prosecutors are asking the appeals court for Illinois' 3rd Judicial District to review a lower court's ruling last summer limiting the hearsay evidence the jury can hear at Peterson's trial. Peterson has been in custody at the Will County Jail since May 2009, when he was charged with the murder of Savio, who was found dead in her bathtub five years earlier.

Since Savio is dead and Stacy Peterson is missing, the defense argues that using their statements to family and friends violates Peterson's Sixth Amendment right to confront the witnesses against him.

In general, hearsay statements made to third parties cannot be introduced at trial unless a defendant can cross-examine the person who made them. There are some exceptions if prosecutors can prove the statement is reliable. But a new Illinois law, which some call "Drew's Law," goes beyond those exceptions.

The law, passed while investigators were looking for Stacy Peterson in 2008, allows courts to consider statements from "unavailable witnesses," provided prosecutors can prove the witness was killed to prevent his or her testimony.

More than 70 witnesses testified early last year at the Peterson hearsay hearing, which resembled a minitrial. The testimony centered on 15 statements Peterson's wives made to others, sometimes expressing fear for their lives.

According to testimony by Savio's sister, Susan Doman, Peterson told Savio that he could kill her and make it look like an accident. Another sister, Anna Doman, claimed Peterson told Savio that she would not make it to the divorce settlement.

Stacy Peterson's pastor, Neil Schori, also testified at the hearing. He said Stacy, who was living with Drew Peterson when Savio died, told him she saw Peterson return home in early the morning Savio died. He was dressed in black and carried a bag of women's clothes that were not hers.

In determining whether any of those statements can be used at trial, Judge Stephen White found after the 2010 hearing it was likely that Peterson murdered Savio and Stacy Peterson. The judge then found fewer than half the 15 statements prosecutors wanted to use were admissible under the new law.

His written decision remains under court seal. Details about which statements are permitted are not yet in the public record, although they are likely to be revealed in court during the arguments on Wednesday.

Stacy Peterson's disappearance in October 2007 renewed investigators' interest in Savio's death, which initially was ruled an accident. Peterson married Stacy Cales, then 19, just eight days after his divorce from Savio.

Savio had been divorced from Peterson for about five months when she died, although the court was still deciding how their marital assets would be divided. Savio was to receive part of Peterson's pension and other support.

Peterson maintains that Savio's death was an accident, as the original ruling indicated, and he denies he had anything to do with it. He also denies having killed Stacy Peterson.

Will County State's Attorney James Glasgow argues in his appeal that the judge should have also considered whether the statements were admissible under a common law doctrine known as "forfeiture by wrongdoing."

The doctrine is part of the federal rules of evidence. Forfeiture by wrongdoing does not require a finding of reliability. Basically, it means that a defendant cannot kill a witness and keep damaging evidence out a trial by arguing that he's lost the right to cross-examine that witness.

Trials in Illinois and elsewhere have used "voices from the grave" to obtain murder convictions.

A month after the lower court ruling barring some of the statements damaging to Peterson, the Illinois Supreme Court issued an opinion in an unrelated case, People v. Hanson. The court upheld convictions in a quadruple murder case which relied, in part, on statements from one of the murder victims.

The Illinois Supreme Court expressly recognized that the doctrine of forfeiture by wrongdoing serves as an exception to the hearsay rule and precludes an argument about right of confrontation guaranteed in the Sixth Amendment.

"Drew's Law" did not apply in Hanson because the trial occurred before the law existed.

In a 2008 Wisconsin case, Mark Jensen was convicted of murdering his wife. The trial judge permitted the jury to read a letter the wife wrote days before her death asking that the police investigate her husband in the event she died.

Peterson's attorneys argue that the new law supersedes the doctrine of forfeiture by wrongdoing.

The new law requires that the judge determine if a statement is reliable. White found that several were not reliable. To fall back now on the less strict doctrine of forfeiture by wrongdoing is to disregard the legislature's intent, Peterson's attorneys say. They also maintain that none of the statements should be used against Peterson because "Drew's Law" is unconstitional.

Peterson's trial is on hold, awaiting the outcome of the appeal. Stacy Peterson has never been found. Peterson says she ran off with another man.

http://www.cnn.com/2011/CRIME/02/15/illinois.drew.peterson.hearsay/index.html (http://www.cnn.com/2011/CRIME/02/15/illinois.drew.peterson.hearsay/index.html)


Title: Re: Stacy Peterson / Drew Peterson Case
Post by: Puma on March 21, 2011, 09:42:20 PM
After everything, Drew Peterson's son is valedictorian

Thomas Peterson, 18, has maintained a GPA above 4.0 and has his sights set on the nation's top colleges.
Alone in the public library in Bolingbrook, Tom Peterson scanned the rows of books when one piqued his interest — a book about stress.

Inside was a stress calculator that listed questions about life experiences and rated the responses. Out of curiosity, the oldest son of Kathleen Savio and Drew Peterson began to answer: Are your parents divorced? Check. Have you lost a parent? Check. He continued through the quiz and tallied his answers.

The results astonished him. His stress level, according to the book, was off the chart.

"I looked at it and I said, 'Wow,' and I giggled a little bit," Peterson, 18, recalled. "I felt like, 'Wow, I must be a wreck right now. I must be an emotional disaster,' you know?"

On the contrary, the lanky, sandy-haired teen will graduate as valedictorian from Bolingbrook High School in June. He is first in a class of 817 students, with a 4.808 GPA, and has his sights set on Harvard, Boston University, UCLA and Northwestern — to name a few — to study neuroscience. His classmates voted him most likely to succeed.

His achievements are all the more remarkable considering his freshman year was just beginning when Stacy Peterson, his father's fourth wife, disappeared.

The national media and legal firestorm that erupted after that October 2007 day filled the streets in front of his home with TV trucks for weeks and sent state police searching for evidence through the family's two-story home.

Tom and his younger brother Kristopher, now 16, scrambled through backyards and side streets to avoid the hordes of cameras, journalists and onlookers. They barricaded themselves in their home when the TV lights flashed on. They watched as their father sorted through piles of hate mail.

Tom Peterson has stood by his father, who is accused of killing Tom's mother and is the prime suspect in Stacy Peterson's disappearance. Drew Peterson, a former Bolingbrook police sergeant, is in a jail cell awaiting trial on charges he murdered Savio in 2004, just weeks before the couple's divorce proceedings were to be finalized. Attorneys from both sides are awaiting an appeals court ruling before a trial date can be set.

Through it all — his father's arrests, the court dates, the tabloid stories — Tom Peterson churned out "A" after "A" in the classroom. He excelled in music, earning spots in the high school jazz band and wind symphony, and in sports, playing for the varsity tennis team.

During a recent interview, he curled up on the sofa in his basement — which he calls his domain in a household of three brothers and a sister from three of his father's four marriages — to talk about the difficulties and successes of his life. His oldest brother, Stephen, 31, takes care of the kids.

"I realized I have one life so I'm just going to make it worth it, you know?" he said.

It's an attitude he adopted after suffering through one of life's harshest lessons. Tom Peterson was 11 when his mom was found dead in an empty bathtub at their Bolingbrook home.

"After she died, it was by far the worst moment in my life," he said, adding he believes his mom died in an accidental drowning. "I realized life was not the fairy tale I thought it was. So, after that, nothing really seemed to affect me emotionally, I guess. That's, honestly, how I'm getting through all this, just because nothing could have been worse than that."

After his mom's death, he thought a lot about life: "I thought about a lot of stuff growing up, like reasons for why things happen or just the frailty of life, I guess. I realized that at an early age."

About that time, he said, he recognized he was gifted. He can pinpoint the moment: sixth grade, and he'd just scored an "A" on a math test. A classmate, he said, turned to him and exclaimed, "Wow, Tom, you're so smart!"

"I said, 'Wait a second, I guess I am!'" he said. "After that, I said I'm going to just push the limits and excel in everything."

Those close to Tom Peterson say the tragedies in his life only drove him to buckle down and work harder.

Bolingbrook High School Principal James Mitchem, who lives two doors from the Petersons and took Tom Peterson into his home for a semester after Drew Peterson's arrest, said the boy's intelligence was apparent from an early age. But it wasn't until high school that he really began to pull away academically from the other kids, including Mitchem's son, Kevin, who is an honors student and Tom Peterson's best friend.

"He's been a very focused young man. He has somehow been able to separate himself from the chaos," Mitchem said. "I've been pretty amazed at how well he has been able to cope with the things that have gone on around him."

Peterson said he constantly sets and accomplishes goals. For example, on New Year's Eve in 2009, upset that a girl he liked was not returning his attention, he wrote out a list of goals to accomplish that year. On it included running a marathon, and running it faster than a friend had the year before.

In October, he completed the Chicago Marathon in 4 hours and 50 seconds — beating his friend by two hours. And that girl? She was also on the list. She's now his girlfriend.

"Whatever he's a part of, he's always pushed himself to be the best that he can be," said Kevin Mitchem, 17. "He's always had that drive."

Peterson steadfastly proclaims his father's innocence. After he turned 18, he asked to be released from a wrongful-death lawsuit filed against his father on his behalf by relatives of his mother. He credits his father with teaching him old-fashioned discipline.

Drew Peterson, who answered questions from jail through his attorney, Joel Brodsky, said his parenting approach was, "If you handle it, I don't have to get involved."

During the interview with Tom Peterson, Drew Peterson, 57, called from jail. At the end of the brief conversation, the son told his father, "I love you. I miss you."

Peterson is saddened that his father, who has missed all of his senior year in high school, most likely will miss his graduation as well.

"It seems like another family member I'm losing," he said.

He stops short of calling his father a role model.

"I wouldn't say role model, with the things he's been involved with, but he's definitely a large … presence," Peterson said.

That presence of Drew Peterson — who thrived on the publicity surrounding the cases of his wives — loomed large in his son's life: the TV and radio interviews, media stunts and his father's revolving door of much younger girlfriends.

In his father's absence, Peterson has gained independence, however prematurely, and found his own voice.

"Him going away was very disappointing, but I feel like if he came back I'd have to have a stern talk with him about the things that he's doing because he's really kind of lost in his ego, I want to say. I'm not going to lie," Peterson said. "'Dad, you do not need to talk to these people right now. You need to stay home and take care of your family.'"

On most days, Peterson is too busy with his schoolwork, and gets too little sleep. Time management is an area he struggles with, he said.

But he doesn't expect to lack for motivation ever. He only has to think about his mom to be inspired.

Just days before she died, he interviewed her for a school assignment about role models.

"It was in elementary school, we were doing a biography and I chose my mother," he said. "I explored where she was born, where she went to school, her favorite subjects. At the end, I said, 'Is there anything you'd like to add that I haven't asked you?'"

She told him: "Life is long and hard, but if you work hard enough for it, you'll master it. Never give up, and always believe in yourself and what you believe in."

"Now I'm looking back on it, I thought, 'Wow, I can really contribute a lot. She really did push me to be the best that I could be," he said.

He keeps her words in a binder next to his bed.

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/ct-met-drew-peterson-son-valedictoria20110319,0,5591520,full.story



Title: Court Upholds Hearsay Limit in Drew Peterson Trial
Post by: Carnut on July 26, 2011, 11:45:46 PM
Court Upholds Hearsay Limit in Drew Peterson Trial

A state appellate court on Tuesday upheld a judge's ruling that disallowed some hearsay -- or second hand -- evidence from being used against Drew Peterson, a blow to prosecutors who have not revealed any physical evidence linking the former police sergeant to his ex-wife's death.

A panel of the Third District Appellate Court in suburban Ottawa said in its ruling that the only way it could overrule now-retired Will County Judge Stephen White was if it found that the judge had abused his discretion.

But the panel found that White's ruling was reasonable.

While prosecutors have never said what if any physical evidence they have against Peterson in the 2004 drowning death of Kathleen Savio, they made it clear last July on the day before jury selection was to begin when they announced they'd delay the trial by appealing the judge's decision that it was crucial to their case.

While Will County State's Attorney James Glasgow said that prosecutors were "very confident in our case," the hearsay hearing also underscored some major problems.

There was, for example, testimony that Savio's death was originally ruled an accident, as well as admissions by police investigators and an evidence technician that not a single fingerprint or any other physical evidence linking Peterson to the death was ever collected.

Glasgow's office did not immediately return a call for comment. But one of Peterson's attorneys said the ruling can only be viewed as devastating to prosecutors.

"The reason they appealed is they said the rulings (by Judge White) prevents them from presenting their case," said Joel Brodsky. "The state's case is weak as it always was."

And Steve Greenberg, who argued on Peterson's behalf before the appellate court said the ruling was a "total" victory.

"They (the judges) didn't buy a single one of the state's arguments," he said.

In fact, he said that not only did the judges rule that prosecutors did not file their appeal soon enough, but that the judges agreed with White that prosecutors should not be allowed to admit various statements from several people, including Savio and Stacy Peterson, Drew Peterson's fourth wife who disappeared in 2007.

Further, the judges ruled White was correct to rule against allowing evidence of some alleged offenses by Peterson prior to Savio's death because it "would unfairly prejudice the defendant."

That could prove particularly damaging to the prosecutors' case against Peterson, said David Erickson, a former judge and professor at Chicago-Kent College of Law.

"They wouldn't have g one after proof of other crimes if they didn't need it," he said.

Erickson said the hearsay evidence would have been particularly important in a case that appears to be absent any direct evidence against Peterson.

"They're trying to create a big circle around this guy that shows he's the only guy who could have done this," he said. "Any loss in that kind of case is going to leave a big hole in that circle."

The ruling was particularly frustrating to Savio's family, who has been trying to convince authorities since shortly after Savio's death that she did not simply drown accidentally.

"It's just very upsetting that we tried to give all this information to everybody years ago," right after Savio was found dead, said Melissa marie Doman of Romeoville, Savio's niece. "And nobody wanted to hear it."

Doman said that if prosecutors have more evidence against Peterson, she does not know what it is.

"Depending on what prosecutors have, they might be back to square one, which I hope not," she said.

Just what hearsay evidence White did not allow has never been revealed and the court, in its ruling, would not disclose it either.

But during the hearsay hearing last year, witnesses testified before White about statements Savio made about being afraid of Peterson and that she'd told them that Peterson said he could kill them and make it look like an accident.

Friends of Stacy Peterson, who disappeared in 2007 and is presumed dead by authorities, said that she made similar statements to them. Drew Peterson has never been charged in Stacy Peterson's disappearance but authorities have said he is a suspect.

Peterson has denied his involvement in both Savio's death and Stacy Peterson's disappearance.

Brodsky said that the ruling clears the way for a trial within the next few months, unless Glasgow's office appeals Tuesday's ruling.

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2011/07/26/court-upholds-hearsay-limit-in-drew-peterson-trial-262200950/ (http://www.foxnews.com/us/2011/07/26/court-upholds-hearsay-limit-in-drew-peterson-trial-262200950/)


Title: Drew Peterson guilty of murder in ex-wife's death
Post by: Carnut on September 06, 2012, 07:59:14 PM
Drew Peterson guilty of murder in ex-wife's death

(CNN) -- An Illinois jury on Thursday found former Chicago-area police sergeant Drew Peterson guilty of murder in the 2004 death of his ex-wife.

The jury of seven men and five women deliberated for nearly 14 hours total before delivering its verdict convicting Peterson in the death of his third wife, Kathleen Savio.

"Finally somebody heard Kathleen's cry," her mother, Marcia Savio, told reporters after the verdict. "Twelve people did the right thing, oh thank God."

Savio was found dead in her dry, clean bathtub on March 1, 2004.

While prosecutors claimed Peterson killed Savio, the defense contended that she fell, hit her head and drowned.

The headline-grabbing case did not arise until after Peterson's fourth wife, Stacy, disappeared in October 2007. It was during the search for Stacy Peterson -- who has not been found -- that investigators said they would look again into Savio's death, which was initially ruled an accidental drowning.

In February 2008, authorities altered their judgment and ruled Savio's death a homicide. Peterson was later arrested and charged with first-degree murder.

Peterson was married to Savio in 2001 when he had an affair with then-17-year-old Stacy Cales, who later became his fourth wife. Savio and Peterson filed for divorce in October 2001 and their relationship remained contentious for the next several years.

Bolingbrook, Illinois, police records indicate officers were called to Savio's home 18 times to intervene in domestic fights from 2002 to 2004. Peterson had Savio arrested twice for domestic violence, though she was found not guilty in both cases.

On February 27, 2004, Peterson picked up his two sons from Savio's home and spent the next two days with them. Prosecutors said he entered her home again early on February 29 and killed her.

At the time of her death, a court was mulling how the couple's marital assets would be divided, and Savio was set to receive part of Peterson's pension and other support.

"We have left-front injuries, left-side injuries, left-back injuries, right injuries, right and left injuries," prosecutor Chris Koch said in his closing argument, disputing the defense assertion Savio's death was an accident. "So it's not just one side of her body; it's multiple sides, four sides.

"How can you get that in one fall? You can't. You can't do it. It's not possible."

The jury released a statement, read outside the Joliet courthouse by Will County Sheriff's Office Deputy Ken Kaupas, in which they thanked the judge, bailiffs and sheriff's office and said they took their responsibility seriously.

"We have reached a decision we believe is just," the jurors said.

The more-than-monthlong trial was marked by repeated missteps by the prosecution that angered Judge Edward Burmila and the defense.

At least four times, prosecutors allowed witnesses to testify to details Burmila had told them not to go into -- such as whether Savio had a protective order against her husband or allowing a witness to demonstrate climbing into a bathtub.

In some cases the defense sought a mistrial and in others they asked the judge to strike entire testimony. Burmila instead ordered the jury to disregard elements of the testimony that went against his orders.

"The disrespect to the court is shocking," Burmila told the prosecution last week.

On Thursday, Will County State's Attorney James Glasgow expressed confidence the conviction, which he called "very sobering," will stand up against appeal.

"We took him on and we won," he said of Peterson, whom he called "a coward and a bully."

"This defendant brutally killed Kathleen Savio."

HLN: Critical moments in the Drew Peterson trial

After Thursday's verdict, Peterson's defense team stood by their client and promised to continue their fight on his behalf. Lawyer Joel Brodsky contended there was a large amount of bias against Peterson before the trial even began.

"He is absolutely innocent," Brodsky said of Peterson, claiming the prosecution's case "was based almost entirely on hearsay." He called Savio's death "a household accident."

The Savio family, though, didn't hide their contempt for what the victim's brother, Nick, called Peterson's "clown defense team who made fun of this whole trial."

Nick Savio called Thursday's verdict "bittersweet," describing the jury's decision as "fantastic" while also lamenting it wouldn't bring back his sister. He added that his family wants Drew Peterson to next be held responsible for whatever happened to Stacy Peterson.

"Although we cannot have Kathleen back, we hope she can now rest in peace and that she knows she has had her day," Nick Savio said, reading out a statement from family. "She will be missed and remembered in our hearts always.

"Stacy, you are now next for justice."

Cassandra Cales, Stacy Peterson's sister, said she hopes the verdict will spur someone to come forward "who knows something about my sister, (because) they feel safe to talk now."

While she says she is still trying to process the import of the jury's decision, Cales said one thought went through her mind immediately after hearing it: "Game over, Drew."

http://www.cnn.com/2012/09/06/justice/illinois-drew-peterson-verdict/index.html?hpt=hp_t3 (http://www.cnn.com/2012/09/06/justice/illinois-drew-peterson-verdict/index.html?hpt=hp_t3)


Title: Hearsay evidence proves crucial in Drew Peterson's conviction
Post by: Carnut on September 07, 2012, 04:55:16 PM
Hearsay evidence proves crucial in Drew Peterson's conviction

By Moni Basu

(CNN) -- Stacy Peterson disappeared five years ago, but the suspicions and fears she harbored about her husband haunted his murder trial and proved crucial in his conviction.

Her words came to life through two crucial witnesses who conveyed Stacy's remarks to jurors. That's hearsay evidence, or what one person tells another outside a courtroom setting.

The allowance of that evidence could possibly form the basis of an appeal by attorneys for former suburban Chicago police Sgt. Drew Peterson, 56, who was found guilty Thursday of the 2004 killing of ex-wife Kathleen Savio.

Stacy Peterson's words and her husband's conviction could also mean that he could face a new murder trial -- this time for the death of Stacy herself.

"Stacy, you are now next for justice," Savio's brother Nick Savio said after the verdict was read.

Savio was Peterson's third wife; Stacy, his fourth.

Stacy vanished in October 2007, but her body has never been found. She left three children behind at home, and her family believes she was killed.

But before Peterson can be charged again, prosecutors would have to prove that Stacy is dead and then that she was murdered.

"The longer someone is gone, the easier it is to prove they haven't just run away and that they are deceased," said James Glasgow, the prosecutor in Will County, southwest of Chicago.

"October 28, 2007, is in our rearview mirror now," he said. "We are going to look at that case and assess it as it stands today, and if we feel confident in going forward, we will be doing so."

Peterson once fueled outrage in the media with his brash behavior and flippant remarks about his wife's disappearance. But Thursday, he sat stone-faced in court as the verdict was read and returned to his jail cell as a murderer with little public sympathy.

His case, however, could live on in the court system for years.

Critical moments from the Drew Peterson trial

"You know what they say, a conviction is a first step in a successful appeal," said Joel Brodsky, Peterson's lawyer.

"Believe me, there's several world-class appellate lawyers just waiting to get their teeth into this."

An appeal could be based on a number of issues, including potential prosecutorial misconduct.

But at the heart of the Peterson trial controversy is the court's allowance of Stacy Peterson's disturbing comments, which jurors said were "extremely critical" to reaching the guilty verdict.

Jurors heard what she had said through the testimony of two key witnesses: the Rev. Neil Schori, Stacy Peterson's pastor, and Harry Smith, Savio's former divorce lawyer.

Schori testified that Stacy told him she woke up in the middle of the night -- the same night that Savio was killed -- and noticed her husband was not in bed.

"After that, it was some time later, in the early morning hours," Schori said. "She saw him standing near the washer and dryer, dressed in all black, carrying a bag. She said that he removed his clothing, and then took the contents of the bag and put all of that into the washing machine."

Schori said Stacy told him that Drew told her he had killed Savio and then coached her to lie to police about it. And she did, Schori said.

Juror Teresa Mathews said Friday that the jury was troubled that police interviewed Stacy while Drew was present.

Smith testified that Stacy planned to divorce Drew and wanted to know if "the fact that he killed Kathy could be used against him" as leverage.

Just days after that phone call with Smith, Stacy disappeared.

Her statements would be struck down in most courts of law: In 2004, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that hearsay violates a defendant's Sixth Amendment right to confront a witness testifying against him or her.

But Illinois passed a special law in 2008 that allows such hearsay evidence in rare instances when prosecutors believe a person was killed to prevent his or her testimony.

The law quickly became known as "Drew's law."

Defense attorneys argued that it was unconstitutional. They said it unfairly targeted Drew Peterson because it was passed after the case had already made national headlines.

"He is absolutely innocent," Brodsky said of Peterson after Thursday's verdict, adding that his client was convicted "based almost entirely on hearsay."

Kelly Saindon, a former prosecutor in Chicago who attended parts of the Peterson trial, said the hearsay evidence was key.

"That was exactly the turning point when the prosecution hit their stride," she told HLN. "Stacy's voice came in, and everyone knew she was gone and that Drew Peterson was a murderer.

"You could see it on the jury's face," she said.

Savio was found dead in her bathtub on March 1, 2004. Her hair was wet, but the tub was clean and dry.

Savio's killing did not garner much publicity until Stacy Peterson went missing and investigators began looking again into the circumstances. They exhumed Savio's body, re-examined it and issued a second report on her death. Savio, it said, was murdered.

Peterson was arrested and charged in May 2009 with first-degree murder.

His lawyers argued her death was accidental -- that she fell, hit her head and drowned. But jurors said Friday that they believed doctors who testified otherwise; that Savio's injuries were not consistent with a bathroom mishap.

Jurors never saw any physical evidence connecting Peterson to Savio's death. Nor was there testimony placing him at the crime scene. But they heard what Stacy said.

The jury of seven men and five women deliberated for nearly 14 hours before reaching their verdict.

When the panel adjourned for the night Wednesday, the jury was 11-1 in favor of a guilty verdict, juror Ron Supalo told reporters. He was the holdout and said it was Schori and Smith's testimony about what Stacy had said that finally swayed him.

"The hearsay evidence was big," he told CNN affiliate WLS-TV. "It seemed all the evidence was pointing toward the defendant being guilty."

Jury foreman Eduardo Saldana said Friday the testimony of Schori and Smith played a big part in the jurors' decision.

Schori said he was "hugely honored to be able to give Stacy a voice."

"The jury did the right thing," he said. "And justice is coming for Stacy's family, too. It's going to happen."

Peterson was married to Savio in 2001 when he had an affair with then-17-year-old Stacy Cales, who eventually became his fourth wife.

Savio and Peterson filed for divorce in October 2001. Their relationship was contentious in the years following, and a legal battle ensued over the division of common property. A court was about to make a ruling in which Savio was expected to receive part of Peterson's pension and other support. But Savio died before the decision.

Peterson is set to be sentenced in late November.

Illinois no longer has the death penalty. Peterson faces a maximum of 60 years in prison.

http://www.cnn.com/2012/09/07/justice/illinois-drew-peterson-verdict/index.html?hpt=hp_t3 (http://www.cnn.com/2012/09/07/justice/illinois-drew-peterson-verdict/index.html?hpt=hp_t3)