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« Reply #480 on: January 07, 2016, 01:59:21 PM »

Pat Harrington Jr., Emmy-winning super on 'One Day at a Time,' dies



Pat Harrington Jr, who won acclaim as the buttinsky building superintendent who rarely fixed anything on the long-running 1970s sitcom, One Day at a Time, has died, according to his family. He was 86.

His daughters Tresa and Terry posted a message on Facebook Thursday announcing his death on Wednesday evening. It included a picture of him as the swaggering, cluttered keychain-wielding Dwayne Schneider from One Day.

"Dear Friends, it is with the most unimaginable pain and sadness, that I tell you my father, Pat Harrington, Jr. passed away at 11:09 PM this evening," Tresa Harrington wrote. "We were all with him today and tonight: crying, laughing and loving him.

"My heart is broken to pieces and I will cry and cry until I just won't," she concluded. "Love to you all! And as we head into this year, never be afraid to tell the people you love, that you love them."

The sitcom, which ran from 1975-1984 on CBS, was a Norman Lear production about a newly single mom, Ann Romano (Bonnie Franklin), who moves back to her hometown of Indianapolis with two teen daughters, Barbara (Valerie Bertinelli), and Julie (MacKenzie Phillips) after her divorce. It was one of the first portrayals of a divorced mom on American TV.

Harrington played  Dwayne Schneider, their building super who thinks he's a ladies man, who swaggers into their lives and becomes part of the family. “The ladies in this building don’t call me ‘super’ for nothing," was one of his lines.

(Franklin died in 2013. Bertinelli and Phillips are still close and still working in Hollywood. Bertinelli paid tribute.

Harrington, in his costume of white T-shirt, blue vest, cigarette pack rolled up in his sleeve, and tool belt that he never seemed to use, regularly stole scenes, Lear once said.  "He turned out to be the comic strength of the show,” Lear said.

The role won Harrington an Emmy and a Golden Globe, plus multiple nominations of each.

Although the show ended in the mid-1980s, there was a reunion special in February 2005, and Harrington took part.

In 2012, Harrington made his final onscreen appearance, appearing as the manager of an apartment building on Bertinelli’s Hot in Cleveland sitcom on TV Land until June 2015.

But his list of TV credits was huge, dating back to 1949 and the Ford Theatre Hour. Make Room for Daddy, The Munsters and The Beverly Hillbillies are only some of the famous series he appeared in. More recently, he appeared in shows such as Curb Your Enthusiasm and The King of Queens.

Pat Harrington Jr. was born on August 13, 1929 in New York City, as Daniel Patrick Harrington Jr.

http://www.usatoday.com/story/life/tv/2016/01/07/emmy-winner-pat-harrington-jr-super-one-day-time-dies/78409300/
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« Reply #481 on: January 11, 2016, 03:29:30 PM »

Rock star David Bowie dead of cancer at age 69



David Bowie, a rock and roll icon who sustained a chart-topping career for five decades with hits including "Fame", "Heroes" and "Let's Dance", has died at the age of 69.

Rep Steve Martin said in a statement that the "Ashes to Ashes" singer was surrounded by his family when he died Sunday after an 18-month battle against cancer.

"While many of you will share in this loss, we ask that you respect the family's privacy during their time of grief," Martin's statement concluded. No further details were provided.

The singer's son, filmmaker Duncan Jones, issued a confirming statement of his own on Twitter.

Bowie died two days after the release of "Blackstar", his 29th album, which had been timed to coincide with his birthday. The singer had kept a low profile in recent years after reportedly suffering a heart attack in the 2000s, and it had not been widely known that he was struggling with cancer.

Long before alter egos and wild outfits became commonplace in pop, Bowie set the music world on its ear with the release of the 1972 album, "The Rise of Ziggy Stardust and Spiders from Mars," which introduced one of music's most famous personas. Ziggy Stardust was a concept album that imagined a genre-bending rock star from outer space trying to make his way in the music world. The persona -- the red-headed, eyeliner wearing Stardust -- would become an enduring part of his legacy, and a touchstone for the way entertainers packaged themselves for years to come.

Bowie, who was born David Jones in the Brixton area of South London, came of age in the glam rock era of the early 1970s. He had a striking androgynous look in his early days and was known for changing his looks and sounds. The stuttering rock sound of "Changes" gave way to the disco soul of "Young Americans," co-written with John Lennon, to a droning collaboration with Brian Eno in Berlin that produced "Heroes."

He had some of his biggest successes in the early 1980s with the stylistic "Let's Dance," and a massive American tour. Another one of his definitive songs was "Under Pressure," which he recorded with Queen; Vanilla Ice would years later infamously use the song's hook for his much maligned smash "Ice Ice Baby."

Bowie was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1996, but he didn't attend the ceremony. Madonna, another artist who knew something about changing styles to stay ahead of the curve, accepted for him and recounted how a Bowie concert changed her life when she attended it as a teenager. David Byrne, of the art rockers Talking Heads, inducted Bowie and said he gave rock music a necessary shot in the arm.

"Like all rock `n' roll, it was visionary, it was tasteless, it was glamorous, it was perverse, it was fun, it was crass, it was sexy and it was confusing," Byrne said.

"My entire career, I've only really worked with the same subject matter," Bowie said in a 2002 interview with The Associated Press. "The trousers may change, but the actual words and subjects I've always chosen to write with are things to do with isolation, abandonment, fear and anxiety -- all of the high points of one's life."

His performance of "Heroes" was a highlight of a concert for rescue workers after the 2001 World Trade Center attacks.

"What I'm most proud of is that I can't help but notice that I've affected the vocabulary of pop music. For me, frankly, as an artist, that's the most satisfying thing for the ego."

However, Bowie felt uneasy about some of his greatest material, once embarking on a "greatest hits" tour saying it would be the last time performing much of his old material. He later relented, however.

"I'm not a natural performer," he said in the 2002 AP interview. "I don't enjoy performing terribly much. Never have. I can do it and, if my mind's on the situation, do it quite well. But five or six shows in, I'm dying to get off the road and go back into the studio."

Bowie was awarded a Grammy lifetime achievement award in February 2006 and his final performance on stage was later that year when he sang alongside Alicia Keys at the Black Ball in New York. He made a surprise comeback in 2013 when he suddenly released a new single on his 66th birthday, with his first new album in 10 years, "The Next Day," following just weeks later.

"Blackstar," which earned positive reviews from critics, represented yet another stylistic shift, as Bowie gathered jazz players to join him. He released a music video on Friday for the new song "Lazarus," which shows a frail Bowie lying in bed and singing the track's lyrics. The song begins with the line: "Look up here, I'm in heaven."

Bowie was married twice, to the actress and model Mary Angela "Angie" Barnett from 1970-80, and to international supermodel Iman since 1992. He had two children -- Duncan Jones and Alexandra Zahra Jones -- one with each wife.

http://www.foxnews.com/entertainment/2016/01/11/rock-star-david-bowie-dead-cancer-at-age-6/
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« Reply #482 on: January 18, 2016, 04:59:20 PM »

Glenn Frey, founding member of the Eagles, dead at 67



Glenn Frey, a founding member of the rock band the Eagles, died Monday in New York City, his publicist announced. He was 67.

Frey “fought a courageous battle” for the past several weeks, according to his publicist, but succumbed to complications from rheumatoid arthritis, acute ulcerative colitis and pneumonia.

“Words can neither describe our sorrow, nor our love and respect for all that he has given to us, his family, the music community & millions of fans worldwide,” his publicist said.

Guitarist Frey and drummer Don Henley formed the Eagles in Los Angeles the early 1970s, along with guitarist Bernie Leadon and bassist Randy Meisner. They would become a top act over the next decade, embodying the melodic California sound.

Henley said in a statement Frey was "like a brother to him."

"The bond we forged 45 years ago was never broken, even during the 14 years that the Eagles were dissolved, he said. "We were two young men who made the pilgrimage to Los Angeles with the same dream:  to make our mark in the music industry - and with perseverance, a deep love of music, our alliance with other great musicians and our manager, Irving Azoff, we built something that has lasted longer than anyone could have dreamed."

An Eagles greatest hits collection from the mid-1970s and "Hotel California" are among the best-selling albums in history.

Frey was born in Detroit and was raised in the suburbs. His solo hits include "The Heat Is On" and "Smuggler's Blues."

http://www.foxnews.com/entertainment/2016/01/18/glenn-frey-founding-member-eagles-dead-at-67/
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« Reply #483 on: January 26, 2016, 04:31:09 PM »

'Barney Miller,' 'Godfather' actor Abe Vigoda dies at 94



Character actor Abe Vigoda, whose leathery, sunken-eyed face made him ideal for playing the over-the-hill detective Phil Fish in the 1970s TV series "Barney Miller" and the doomed Mafia soldier in "The Godfather," died Tuesday at age 94.

Vigoda's daughter, Carol Vigoda Fuchs, told The Associated Press that Vigoda died Tuesday morning in his sleep at Fuchs' home in Woodland Park, New Jersey. The cause of death was old age.

"This man was never sick," Fuchs said.

Vigoda worked in relative obscurity as a supporting actor in the New York theater and in television until Francis Ford Coppola cast him in the 1972 Oscar-winning "The Godfather." Vigoda played Sal Tessio, an old friend of Vito Corleone's (Marlon Brando) who hopes to take over the family after Vito's death by killing his son Michael Corleone (Al Pacino). But Michael anticipates that Sal's suggestion for a "peace summit" among crime families is a setup and the escorts Sal thought were taking him to the meeting turn out to be his executioners.

"Tell Mike it was only business," Sal mutters to consigliere Tom Hagen (Robert Duvall) as he's led away.

The great success of the film and "The Godfather Part II" made his face and voice, if not his name, recognizable to the general public and led to numerous roles, often as hoodlums.

But it was his comic turn in "Barney Miller," which starred Hal Linden and ran from 1975 to 1982, that brought Vigoda's greatest recognition.

He liked to tell the story of how he won the role of Detective Fish. An exercise enthusiast, Vigoda had just returned from a five-mile jog when his agent called and told him to report immediately to the office of Danny Arnold, who was producing a pilot for a police station comedy.

Arnold remarked that Vigoda looked tired, and the actor explained about his jog. "You know, you look like you might have hemorrhoids," Arnold said. "What are you — a doctor or a producer?" Vigoda asked. He was cast on the spot.

"The Complete Directory to Prime Time Network and Cable TV Shows," a reference book, commented that Vigoda was the hit of "Barney Miller." ''Not only did he look incredible, he sounded and acted like every breath might be his last," it said. "Fish was always on the verge of retirement, and his worst day was when the station house toilet broke down."

Vigoda remained a regular on "Barney Miller" until 1977 when he took the character to his own series, "Fish." The storyline dealt with the detective's domestic life and his relations with five street kids that he and his wife took into their home.

The show lasted a season and a half. Vigoda continued making occasional guest appearances on "Barney Miller," quitting over billing and salary differences.

But he remained a popular character actor in films, including "Cannonball Run II," ''Look Who's Talking," ''Joe Versus the Volcano" and "North."

His resemblance to Boris Karloff led to his casting in the 1986 New York revival of "Arsenic and Old Lace," playing the role Karloff originated on the stage in the 1940s. (The murderous character in the black comedy is famously said by other characters to resemble Boris Karloff, a great joke back when the real Karloff was playing him.)

Born in New York City in 1921, Vigoda attended the Theater School of Dramatic Arts at Carnegie Hall. In the early 1950s, he appeared as straight man for the Jimmy Durante and Ed Wynn TV comedies.

For 30 years, he worked in the theater, acting in dozens of plays in such diverse characters as John of Gaunt in "Richard II" (his favorite role) and Abraham Lincoln in a short-lived Broadway comedy "Tough to Get Help."

Vigoda attributed his high percentage in winning roles to his performance in auditions. Instead of delivering the tired soliloquies that most actors performed, he wrote his own, about a circus barker. At a surprise 80th birthday party in New Jersey in 2001, he gave a spirited recital of the monologue to the delight of the 100 guests.

Reflecting on his delayed success, Vigoda once remarked: "When I was a young man, I was told success had to come in my youth. I found this to be a myth. My experiences have taught me that if you deeply believe in what you are doing, success can come at any age."

"Barney Miller" became his first steady acting job.

"I'm the same Abe Vigoda," he told an interviewer. "I have the same friends, but the difference now is that I can buy the things I never could afford before. I have never had a house before, so now I would like a house with a nice garden and a pool. Hollywood has been very kind to me."

He was married twice, most recently to Beatrice Schy, who died in 1992. He had his daughter with his first wife, Sonja Gohlke, who has also died. Vigoda is survived by his daughter, grandchildren Jamie, Paul and Steven, and a great-grandson.

Reruns of "Barney Miller" and repeated screenings of the two "Godfather" epics kept Vigoda in the public eye, and unlike some celebrities, he enjoyed being recognized. In 1997 he was shopping in Bloomingdale's in Manhattan when a salesman remarked: "You look like Abe Vigoda. But you can't be Abe Vigoda because he's dead." Vigoda often appeared on lists of living celebrities believed to have passed away.

http://www.foxnews.com/entertainment/2016/01/26/barney-miller-actor-abe-vigoda-dies-at-4/
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« Reply #484 on: March 09, 2016, 12:20:19 PM »

Former first lady Nancy Reagan has passed away



LOS ANGELES, CA - Nancy Reagan, the helpmate, backstage adviser and fierce protector of Ronald Reagan in his journey from actor to president — and finally during his 10-year battle with Alzheimer's disease — has died. She was 94.

The former first lady died Sunday at her home in Bel-Air, California, of congestive heart failure, assistant Allison Borio told The Associated Press.

Her best-known project as first lady was the "Just Say No" campaign to help kids and teens stay off drugs.

When she swept into the White House in 1981, the former Hollywood actress partial to designer gowns and pricey china was widely dismissed as a pre-feminist throwback, concerned only with fashion, decorating and entertaining. By the time she moved out eight years later, Mrs. Reagan was fending off accusations that she was a behind-the-scenes "dragon lady" wielding unchecked power over the Reagan administration — and doing it based on astrology to boot.

All along she maintained that her only mission was to back her "Ronnie" and strengthen his presidency.

She also championed Alzheimer's patients, raising millions of dollars for research and breaking with fellow conservative Republicans to advocate for stem cell studies. Her dignity and perseverance in these post-White House roles helped smooth over the public's fickle perceptions of the former first lady.Mrs. Reagan carried that charge through the rest of her days. She served as a full-time caretaker as Alzheimer's melted away her husband's memory. After his death in June 2004 she dedicated herself to tending his legacy, especially at his presidential library in California, where he had served as governor.

The Reagans' mutual devotion over 52 years of marriage was legendary. They were forever holding hands. She watched his political speeches with a look of such steady adoration it was dubbed "the gaze." He called her "Mommy," and penned a lifetime of gushing love notes. She saved these letters, published them as a book, and found them a comfort when he could no longer remember her.

In announcing his Alzheimer's diagnosis in 1994, Reagan wrote, "I only wish there was some way I could spare Nancy from this painful experience." Ten years later, as his body lay in state in the U.S. Capitol, Mrs. Reagan caressed and gently kissed the flag-draped casket.

As the newly arrived first lady, Mrs. Reagan raised more than $800,000 from private donors to redo the White House family quarters and to buy a $200,000 set of china bordered in red, her signature color. She was criticized for financing these pet projects with donations from millionaires who might seek influence with the government, and for accepting gifts and loans of dresses worth thousands of dollars from top designers. Her lavish lifestyle — in the midst of a recession and with her husband's administration cutting spending on the needy — inspired the mocking moniker "Queen Nancy."

But her admirers credited Mrs. Reagan with restoring grace and elegance to the White House after the austerity of the Carter years.

    I am saddened by the passing of my step mother Nancy Reagan...She is once again with the man she loved.God Bless...
    ...
    — Michael Reagan (@ReaganWorld) March 6, 2016

Her substantial influence within the White House came to light slowly in her husband's second term.

Although a feud between the first lady and chief of staff Donald Regan had spilled into the open, the president dismissed reports that it was his wife who got Regan fired. "The idea that she is involved in governmental decisions and so forth and all of this, and being a kind of dragon lady — there is nothing to that," a visibly angry Reagan assured reporters.

But Mrs. Reagan herself and other insiders later confirmed her role in rounding up support for Regan's ouster and persuading the president that it had to be done, because of the Iran-Contra scandal that broke under Regan's watch.

She delved into policy issues, too. She urged Reagan to finally break his long silence on the AIDS crisis. She nudged him to publicly accept responsibility for the arms-for-hostages scandal. And she worked to buttress those advisers urging him to thaw U.S. relations with the Soviet Union, over the objections of the administration's "evil empire" hawks.

Near the end of Reagan's presidency, ex-chief of staff Regan took his revenge with a memoir revealing that the first lady routinely consulted a San Francisco astrologer to guide the president's schedule. Mrs. Reagan, who had a longtime interest in horoscopes, maintained that she used the astrologer's forecasts only in hopes of predicting the safest times for her husband to venture out of the White House after an assassination attempt by John Hinckley just three months into Reagan's presidency.

Anne Frances Robbins, nicknamed Nancy, was born on July 6, 1921, in New York City. Her parents separated soon after she was born and her mother, film and stage actress Edith Luckett, went on the road. Nancy was reared by an aunt until 1929, when her mother married Dr. Loyal Davis, a wealthy Chicago neurosurgeon who gave Nancy his name and a socialite's home. She majored in drama at Smith College and found stage work with the help of her mother's connections.

In 1949, MGM signed 5-foot-4, doe-eyed brunette Nancy Davis to a movie contract. She was cast mostly as a loyal housewife and mother. She had a key role in "The Next Voice You Hear ...," an unusual drama about a family that hears God's voice on the radio. In "Donovan's Brain," she played the wife of a scientist possessed by disembodied gray matter.

She met Ronald Reagan in 1950, when he was president of the Screen Actors Guild and she was seeking help with a problem: Her name had been wrongly included on a published list of suspected communist sympathizers. They discussed it over dinner, and she later wrote that she realized on that first blind date "he was everything that I wanted."

They wed two years later, on March 4, 1952. Daughter Patti was born in October of that year and son Ron followed in 1958. Reagan already had a daughter, Maureen, and an adopted son, Michael, from his marriage to actress Jane Wyman. (Later, public spats and breaches with her grown children would become a frequent source of embarrassment for Mrs. Reagan.)

She was thrust into the political life when her husband ran for California governor in 1966 and won. She found it a surprisingly rough business.

"The movies were custard compared to politics," Mrs. Reagan said.

http://www.abc15.com/news/national/report-former-first-lady-nancy-reagen-has-passed-away
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« Reply #485 on: March 23, 2016, 10:23:56 PM »

Hall of Fame sportscaster, MLB catcher Joe Garagiola dead at 90



Joe Garagiola, a Major League Baseball legend who successfully moved from the field to the broadcast booth, has died at the age of 90, the Arizona Diamondbacks announced Wednesday. The cause of his death was unclear.

Garagiola entertained audiences for 58 years with a sharp sense of humor and a seemingly endless trove of stories. Popular with those who followed sports and those who didn't, his personality transcended games and landed him a pair of stints on the "Today" show, a slot as a guest host in Carson's seat on "The Tonight Show," spots as a game show host and almost a decade on Westminster dog show telecasts.

His longtime friend, Yogi Berra, died last year.

A 20-year-old rookie with the World Series champion St. Louis Cardinals in 1946 — he had more hits and RBIs in the seven-game matchup against Boston than Ted Williams — Garagiola spent nine seasons in the majors as a catcher. He was a career .257 hitter, then really became a star once he stopped playing.

Garagiola's first broadcast job was alongside the famed Harry Caray with the Cardinals. He later with Curt Gowdy and Vin Scully on NBC broadcasts, mixing in keen insights gleaned from his playing days along with funny stories he picked up along the way.

In 1991, he won the Ford C. Frick Award for baseball broadcasting excellence that earned him a permanent place in the Hall of Fame. He served as a part-time commentator for the Diamondbacks after his son, Joe Jr., was hired as the team's general manager.

During a retirement ceremony in 2013, Garagiola offered a sample of the tales that made him a part of the game's soundtrack for so long.

Garagiola recalled a pitcher "who will remain nameless" who threw only a fastball. But when Garagiola put down the sign for the fastball, the pitcher kept shaking it off. Finally, an exasperated Garagiola went out to the mound.

"I go out there and said, 'What do you want to throw?'" Garagiola recalled. "He said a slider. I said, 'You don't throw a slider.' He said, 'That's why I'll get him out, he won't be lookin' for it.'"

He remembered a time when Dusty Rhodes, known for his clutch hitting, came to bat. The fidgety pitcher, Cliff Stein, was concerned about how to work. "Dusty," Garagiola said, "was known to take a drink now and again."

"I said I don't care what you are going to throw," Garagiola said, "but don't hit him in the back pocket or we'll have Jack Daniels all over home plate."

For nine years, Garagiola worked on the telecasts of the Westminster dog show at Madison Square Garden in New York, taking an everyman's approach to the entries. A proud owner of Yorkshire terriers, Garagiola was parodied by Fred Willard on the mockumentary "Best in Show," an over-the-top portrayal that rankled the veteran announcer.

"Some people thought Joe didn't know about dogs, but he really did," longtime Westminster TV host David Frei said. "Nine times out of 10, he already knew the answer to the question he was asking me. He was just putting it in my wheelhouse."

"He was a real pro, he taught me so much about the business. He was a perfect partner," Frei said. "And he loved dogs."

Garagiola said his fondest memory was the 2001 season when the Diamondbacks, with his son, Joe Garagiola Jr., as the team's general manager, beat the New York Yankees in the World Series.

"Baseball, it hasn't changed that much," Garagiola said. "You still have to hit the ball and you still have to catch it. Good players will win and bad players will lose. Winners win and losers make excuses. It's as simple as that."

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2016/03/23/hall-fame-sportscaster-mlb-catcher-joe-garagiola-dead-at-90.html
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« Reply #486 on: March 24, 2016, 07:29:07 PM »

Comedian Garry Shandling dead at 66



Comedian Garry Shandling, known for “It’s Garry Shandling’s Show” and “The Larry Sanders Show,” died Thursday. He was 66.

Los Angeles Police officer Tony Im told the Associated Press that Shandling died Thursday in Los Angeles. Im said officers were dispatched to Shandling's home Thursday for a reported medical emergency. Shandling was transported to a hospital, where he was pronounced dead.

A coroner's official said late Thursday that Shandling's death appears to be from natural causes and no autopsy is planned. Lt. David Smith told the Associated Press there has been no official cause of death determination yet, but medical records will be used to determine how the 66-year-old comedian died.

An innovative and eccentric humorist with pillowy lips and a voice that always seemed on the verge of a whine, Shandling claimed to disdain too much logic cluttering his life.

"The answer isn't gonna be in the facts," he told The Associated Press in 2009. "It's gonna be in intuition. That's how I work creatively. I'm always teaching people that the answer to that creative question is right here, in the room, between us here."

More to the point, it was dealing with the questions he confronted in himself.

Born on Nov. 29, 1949 in Chicago, Shandling was raised in Tucson, Arizona. On arriving in Los Angeles as a young adult, it was a short hop from a brief stint in the advertising business to comedy writing and stand-up.

Then in the 1980s, he began to experiment with TV comedy, and to toy with the sitcom form, with his first series, "It's Garry Shandling's Show," a Showtime project that made no bones about its inherently artificial nature: the actors in this otherwise standard domestic comedy routinely broke the fourth wall to comment on what they were up to. Even the theme song began with the explanatory lyrics, "The theme to Garry's show...."

Then, in August 1992, Shandling created his comic masterpiece with "The Larry Sanders Show," which starred him as an egomaniacal late-night TV host with an angst-ridden show-biz life behind the scenes.

It was just three months after Carson had retired from "The Tonight Show," where Shandling had appeared as a stand-up and occasional Carson stand-in. It seemed a wry but deeply felt homage to the King of Late Night.

But it was more. "Larry Sanders" proved to be an act of courage, a brave effort led by someone portraying a character dangerously close to himself. As Larry, Garry dug deep to confront his own demons, and did it brilliantly as the series teetered between dual realities: public and private; make-believe and painfully true.

Real-life celebrities appeared as guests on Larry's show-within-the-show, and also interacted with him "off the air."

David Duchovny, agreeing to come on the show, also came on to Larry romantically once he got the chance.

Jim Carrey delivered a rip-roaring comic tribute to his host on the final broadcast, then, during a commercial break, turned on him in rage over a long-ago slight.

"Are you doing a bit, now?" asked Larry, perplexed.

"We're OFF the air," Carrey hissed. "This is real life now."

The show explored the fuzzy distinction between TV life and real life, and the loneliness of someone at its crossing. The closest thing Larry had to friends were his chronically needy announcer Hank (Jeffrey Tambor) and his Napoleonic producer, Artie (Rip Torn). Together the three actors were among TV's best-ever trios.

After "Sanders" ended in 1998, Shandling's public appearances were few.

He was mentioned as a candidate to follow David Letterman as a bona fide late-night host for CBS' 12:30 a.m. slot, but no deal was made.

 "I would not do a show where you just sit and talk to somebody," Shandling had said back in 1993 when he was courted by NBC to take over for Letterman on "Late Night."

His films included "Hurlyburly" in 1998, "What Planet Are You From?" in 2000 and "Zoolander" in 2001.

He hosted the Emmy Awards in 2000 and 2004.

On the latter occasion, he spotted Donald Trump in the audience and congratulated the billionaire developer for hosting the Emmy-nominated "The Apprentice."

"Nice to see a man who's paid his dues, worked hard," Shandling said. "We all know what it feels like to have to build 80-story condos and gambling casinos just to get our foot in the door in show business."

In his own business dealings, Shandling became one of the rich and famous targeted by private eye Anthony Pellicano, who was sentenced to prison in 2008 on convictions of racketeering and more than six dozen other counts, including conspiracy, wire fraud and wiretapping in the Hollywood wiretaps case.

Pellicano was accused of wiretapping stars such as Sylvester Stallone and bribing police officers to run names of people, including Shandling, through law enforcement databases.

While Shandling never married, his most public romance was with "Sanders" co-star and fiancee Linda Doucett, who played Hank's comely assistant in the series' early seasons.

Doucett sued Shandling after he fired her following their breakup in the mid-1990s, receiving a reported $1 million settlement, The New York Times reported in 2006.

After news of his death broke on Thursday, reaction poured in from celebrities on Twitter.

On Thursday, Kathy Griffin posted a photo with the message, "Sunday, my longtime friend Garry Shandling was here, making every1 laugh. I loved him. I'll miss our talks the most"

After news of his death broke on Thursday, reaction poured in from celebrities on Twitter.

Amy Schumer wrote on Twitter, "Goodbye Gary Shandling thank you for your kindness and your generosity and for making me laugh so damn much"

"Sad today. My friend @GarryShandling passed. He encouraged me from the very start. A few weeks ago he told me life was short and enjoy it," Kristin Chenoweth wrote.

"Oh my ..GOD will laugh now as he never has Before REST IN PEACE .. Wayyyy too soon," Henry Winkler wrote.

"Gary Shandling was a comedy hero of mine," Zach Braff wrote. "He once sent me a thank you note that read, "Thanks for nothing." RIP."

http://www.foxnews.com/entertainment/2016/03/24/comedian-garry-shandling-dead-at-66/
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« Reply #487 on: March 29, 2016, 04:20:09 PM »

Actress Patty Duke dead at 69



Patty Duke, who won an Oscar as a teen for "The Miracle Worker" and maintained a long and successful career throughout her life, has died. She was 69.

Duke’s agent confirmed her death to the Associated Press saying she died early Tuesday morning of sepsis from a ruptured intestine.

She had "really, really suffered" with her illness, her son Sean Astin stated. From late last week until early Tuesday morning, he said, "was a really, really, really hard process. It was hard for her, it was hard for the people who love her to help her...."

Duke celebrated her 30th wedding anniversary two weeks ago and tweeted about the occasion. It was her last message to fans via her verified Twitter account.

Duke's family released a statement through her publicist.
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patty duke reuters 876.jpgExpand / Contract

Award-winning actress Patty Duke poses for photographers following an unveiling ceremony, honoring her with the 2,260th star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in Los Angeles, California August, 17, 2004. REUTERS

"This morning, our beloved wife, mother and matriarch and the exquisite artist, humanitarian and champion for mental health, Anna Patty Duke Pearce, closed her eyes, quieted her pain and ascended into a beautiful place. We celebrate the infinite love and compassion she shared through her work and throughout her life."

Duke, born Anna Marie Pearce, followed on her early success playing the young Helen Keller with a popular sitcom, "The Patty Duke Show," which aired in the mid-1960s. She played dual roles under a then-unconventional premise: identical twins living in Brooklyn Heights, N.Y.

In 2015, she played twin roles again: as a pair of grandmas on an episode of "Liv and Maddie," a series on the Disney Channel.

Duke had a difficult childhood with abusive parents. By 8 years old she was largely under the control of husband-and-wife talent managers who soon found her work on soap operas and print advertising.

In the meantime, they supplied her with alcohol and prescription drugs, which accelerated the effects of her undiagnosed bipolar disorder.

In her 1988 memoir, "Call Me Anna," Duke wrote of her condition and its diagnosis only six years earlier, and of the treatment that subsequently stabilized her life. The book became a 1990 TV film in which she starred, and she became an activist for mental health causes, helping to de-stigmatize bipolar disorder.

In addition to the Oscar she took home at age 16 for playing Helen Keller in "The Miracle Worker," Duke won three Emmys at the height of her career for roles in "My Sweet Charlie," "Captains and the Kings" and the TV adaptation of "The Miracle Worker." She also won two Golden Globes, one for Most Promising Newcomer in 1963 and another for her role in "Me, Natalie" in 1970. 

The actress is survived by her husband Michael Pearce, her sons from previous relationships Sean Astin and Mackenzie Astin and another son whom she adopted with Pearce.

She was previously married to Harry Falk, Michael Tell and John Astin. She also had a widely publicized relationship with Desi Arnaz Jr.

http://www.foxnews.com/entertainment/2016/03/29/actress-patty-duke-dead/?intcmp=latestnews
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« Reply #488 on: April 01, 2016, 03:06:09 PM »

Actor Ken Howard, TV actor and acting union leader, dies



Actor Ken Howard, who starred in the 1970s series "The White Shadow" and served as president of SAG-AFTRA, has died at age 71.

The union announced Howard's death Wednesday. No cause of death was given.

Howard's career spanned four decades in TV, theater and film. In the CBS series "The White Shadow," which aired from 1978 to 1981, he starred as a white coach to an urban high school basketball team — a part, one of Howard's best known, that drew on the personal history of the 6 feet 6 inch tall actor, who played basketball growing up on Long Island in New York and at Amherst College.

He was a staple character actor on television, starring opposite Blythe Danner in "Adam's Rib" on ABC and appearing as the chipper Kabletown boss Hank Hooper on NBC's "30 Rock."

Howard played Thomas Jefferson on Broadway in "1776," a role he reprised in the 1972 film. He won a Tony Award for Robert Marasco's Catholic boarding school drama "Child's Play."

After making his film debut opposite Liza Minnelli in 1970's "Tell Me That You Love Me," Howard's films included "Rambo," ''In Her Shoes" and "Michael Clayton." He won an Emmy for his performance in HBO's "Grey Gardens" in 2009.

He was also familiar to viewers of the Screen Actors Guild Awards, providing an update on the union's accomplishments during the televised awards ceremony.

Howard was elected president of the Screen Actors Guild in 2009 and was a catalyst for its 2012 merger with the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists union. Combined, the groups represent 160,000 actors, broadcasters and recording artists.

Howard was the first president of SAG-AFTRA and was re-elected to the post last year.

"Ken was a remarkable leader and his powerful vision for this union was a source of inspiration for all of us," SAG-AFTRA Executive Director David White wrote in a statement. "He was an exceptional person and we are deeply saddened by his passing. He had a remarkable career and he never forgot what it was like to be a working performer."

Howard was born March 28, 1944, in El Centro, California. He received a transplant from a friend and stuntwoman Jeannie Epper. He is survived by his wife of 25 years, stuntwoman Linda Fetters Howard, and had three adult stepchildren from a previous marriage.

http://www.foxnews.com/entertainment/2016/03/23/actor-ken-howard-tv-actor-and-acting-union-leader-dies/
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« Reply #489 on: April 19, 2016, 02:06:31 PM »

Home Doris Roberts Dead at 90 Doris Roberts Dead at 90



Doris Roberts, the beloved mom from "Everybody Loves Raymond," has died ... TMZ has learned.

We're told Doris passed away Sunday at home in L.A.

She won 5 Emmy awards, 4 of them for 'Raymond.' She's also starred in tons of other TV shows and movies, like "National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation" and "Grandma's Boy."

She's survived by her son, Michael Cannata Jr., who she had with her first husband. Doris' second husband, William Goyen, died in 1983.

Doris was 90 years old.

We last saw her about a month ago where we frequently got her -- going to the movies at the ArcLight in Hollywood. Doris said she wasn't feeling great, but she was as witty as ever.

http://www.tmz.com/2016/04/18/doris-roberts-dead/
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« Reply #490 on: May 19, 2016, 12:55:56 PM »

'60 Minutes' correspondent Morley Safer dead at 84



“60 Minutes” correspondent Morley Safer, who retired just a week ago after 52 years at CBS, has died, the network announced on Thursday. He was 84.

"60 Minutes" said goodbye to Safer on Sunday, honoring the newsman who was a fixture at the CBS newsmagazine.

The tribute marked the close of a decades-long career for Safer, who, according to the program, had the longest-ever run on prime-time television.

During the hourlong show, Safer was described as tough, funny, intrepid, curious and courageous, with reporting that ranged from the Cold War to cyberspace, from the Muppets to the Orient Express.

Safer's first report on "60 Minutes" in 1970 was about the training of U.S. Sky Marshals. His 919th and last, a profile of Danish architect Bjarke Ingels, was broadcast in March. At 84 and dealing with health issues, Safer had cut back on work in recent years. The Toronto-born Safer was the first Saigon bureau chief for CBS News.

"Morley was right in back of me every step of the way. I had to do it. He didn't," recalled a former Army soldier whose unit Safer joined for a story. Slogging through the jungle with bullets sometimes flying was tough and dangerous duty, but "Morley was cool as a hog on ice."

His 1965 report on U.S. Marines burning the Vietnamese village of Cam Ne was a turning point in public attitude toward the war. An outraged President Lyndon Johnson wanted him fired.

Safer broadcast a report from inside China in 1967 when it still was largely a closed society and, as a Canadian Broadcast Corp. reporter, witnessed the building of the Berlin Wall in Germany in 1961.

He was a London bureau chief for CBS News in the late 1960s before joining "60 Minutes."

Safer considered one element above all — the spoken word — to be essential for great television: "What you're aiming at," he said, "are people's ears rather than their eyes."

A focus on language over video might sound strange for a journalist so identified with TV.

"I really don't like being on television. I find it intimidating," he confided, but added he had long ago made peace with it, explaining with a sly smile, "the money's very good."

http://www.foxnews.com/entertainment/2016/05/19/60-minutes-correspondent-morley-safer-dead-at-84.html
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« Reply #491 on: May 24, 2016, 05:19:50 PM »

Burt Kwouk, Pink Panther star, dies aged 85



Burt Kwouk, who was best known for playing Inspector Clouseau's manservant Cato in the Pink Panther films, has died aged 85.

He appeared in seven Pink Panther films opposite Peter Sellers as Clouseau's servant who regularly attacked his employer to keep him alert.

He also starred in BBC sitcom Last of the Summer Wine from 2002 to 2010.

The actor, who was born in Warrington but raised in Shanghai, was awarded an OBE in the 2011 New Year Honours List.

A statement issued by his agent said: "Beloved actor Burt Kwouk has sadly passed peacefully away. The family will be having a private funeral but there will be a memorial at a later date."

On the big screen Kwouk also appeared in three James Bond films including Goldfinger and You Only Live Twice.

Kwouk had a long TV career, appearing in numerous TV shows including The Avengers and Doctor Who. He also played Major Yamauchi in the 1980s wartime television drama Tenko.

He joined long-running sitcom Last of the Summer Wine as electrician Entwistle - a part that was written with him in mind.

The actor appeared in Harry Hill's comedy series in the 1990s and also gained a cult following when he presented Channel 4's interactive gambling show Banzai from 2001-2004.

Many fans have been paying tribute on social media and sharing their favourite clips of Kwouk as Cato.

Film director Duncan Jones tweeted: "Just heard the wonderful Burt Kwouk has passed away. Lovely man. Was willing to work with film students like myself."

Al Murray also tweeted how he "was very lucky to have worked with Burt Kwouk on the Harry Hill show way back when".

'Allo 'Allo! actress Vicky Michelle tweeted a picture of herself with Burt Kwouk and said she knew him well through their charity work with the Heritage Foundation.

"Fab actor, lovely fun and gentle man," she said.

Kwouk started acting when he returned to England in 1954 after his family's wealth was wiped out in the 1949 revolution.

His big break came 10 years later when director Blake Edwards offered him the part of Cato Fong, opposite Peter Sellers's Inspector Clouseau.

His double act with Sellers was hugely popular with fans and he continued in the role of Cato after Sellers died in 1980, appearing opposite Roger Moore and Roberto Benigni when they took on the role of the bumbling French detective.

Kwouk said he never expected the part to continue for such a long time, starring in his first Pink Panther film in 1974 and the last in 1992.

"They were always a lot of fun because after a while I got to know Cato quite well and I liked Cato because he never argued with me and he never borrowed money from me. I liked playing Cato quite a lot," he told the BBC in 2011.

Talking about his career after being awarded an OBE for services to drama, the actor said working on the James Bond movies was a special experience.

"Bond movies are always great fun because everything about them is big, expansive, huge - the sets are big, the amounts of money that is spent is huge as well, and the whole thing has a big atmosphere about it. And actors like doing that kind of thing."

But if he had to pick a favourite role, the star said it would be the first time he "had a featured role in a good movie".

"You always remember your first of anything - your first house, your first car, your first child, your first woman - you always remember those things and this was a picture made in 1958.

"It was The Inn of the Sixth Happiness which starred a great lady called Ingrid Bergman, I remember that very fondly."

He is survived by his wife Caroline Tebbs, who he married in 1961 and a son.

http://www.bbc.com/news/entertainment-arts-36370997
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